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The US Bombs Raqqa

Coalition forces (a euphemism for the American Air Force) bombed the ISIS “capital” of Raqqa from the skies on the 4th of July.

Brett McGurk, the US envoy for the coalition, says the latest attacks were “the most sustained air strikes to date” against ISIS in Syria.

That’s great and all, but the war against ISIS is still spectacularly unserious. A mere eighteen vehicles and bridges were destroyed.

ISIS has a lot more than eighteen vehicles, and there was a time not long ago when they didn’t have any. They were just a modest insurgent force hiding out in the shadows.

They gained traction because Sunni Arabs in Iraq and Syria would rather tolerate fanatical Salafists than the Syrian-Iranian-Hezbollah axis in Damascus, Tehran, and Baghdad. That’s the root cause, and no one is doing the first thing about it.

There are only two ways to eradicate ISIS.

Someone will have to go in there and kill them.

Or the locals need to rise up as they did in Iraq’s Anbar Province in the last days of the Iraq war and make it impossible for the “caliphate” to operate in their areas. That might happen if ISIS crucifies enough children or lashes too many people for smoking, but in all likelihood we’ll first need regime-change in Syria and Iran.

In the meantime, we’re doing the war-fighting equivalent of fighting lung cancer with cough drops.

 

 

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