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Will Greece Tilt Toward Moscow?

Geoff Dyer in the Financial Times wonders if Greece will tilt toward Russia if it defaults on its debts and is bailed out by Vladimir Putin.

As Washington tries to maintain a united western front in support of sanctions on Russia over Ukraine, a Greek default could provide Moscow an opportunity to sow new divisions among America’s European allies.

“You can easily see how geopolitically this would be a gift to Russia,” says Sebastian Mallaby at the Council on Foreign Relations. “You do not want Europe to have to deal with a Greece that is a member of Nato but which all of a sudden hates the west and is cosying up to Russia.”

Greece has been on the verge of bankruptcy before it even joined the European Union. A nice place to visit, I guess, but it’s barely more functional than Egypt.

The current prime minister’s party, Syriza, is a radical leftist coalition that includes not only Euroskeptics but outright communists in its ranks. One may suppose it’s better by an iota than its far-right counterpart, Golden Dawn, which includes Nazis and Hitler enthusiasts in its ranks and doesn’t flinch from putting an updated swastika on its flag, but that isn’t saying much.

Political derangement is, alas, par for the course down there. A fascistic military dictatorship seized power in 1967. Georgios Papadopoulos’ Regime of the Colonels made Vladimir Putin look like an anarchist in comparison and didn’t let up until the Turks invaded Cyprus in 1974.

Most Greeks threw their support behind Slobodan Milosevic during the Yugoslavian genocide, and the current government recently threatened to seize German assets.

Will they fall in with Vladimir Putin? Probably not. But it wouldn’t be much out of character.

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