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Fall 2009

Writing in World Affairs last year, George Packer noted that, on the home front, the Iraq War was “an abstraction that routinely shades into caricature” and that “the image of Iraq is flickering and formless.” The indictment here was largely, and justifiably in my view, directed at press coverage of the war. I recall a discussion in 2006 with an Army officer, who charged that the media were ... Read More

American Brethren: Hebrews and Puritans

From the first Thanksgiving to The Scarlet Letter, the Puritans are well known to most Americans. But as Jim Sleeper reminds us, Cotton Mather and his tribe took more than one of their strokes from the ancient Hebrews—and the influence lives on.

The Big Story: Our Embattled Media

News coverage of the Iraq War will be studied by future journalists and officers alike. ABC's Marcus Wilford offers an initial assessment of what worked—and what didn't.

The Ugly American: A Rhodes Scholar Goes South

The New Republic's James Kirchick chronicles the misadventures of a bobo abroad.

Mullahs on the Verge: Iran's People, Iran's Pulpits

Despite the tension mounting between Iran's leaders and practically everyone else—at home and abroad—Abbas Milani argues that the West should address the problem with smart diplomacy, not smart bombs.

Restraining Order: For Strategic Modesty

The world may still need a lot of help, but as Harvey Sapolsky and his colleagues argue, it's time that we divvy up some of the work among our allies.

Spoilers: The End of the Peace Process

Elliott Abrams and Michael Singh show how the Middle East peace process has been fatally misguided—and what should be done to fix it.

The Cosmopolitan Tongue: The Universality of English

This century promises the death of most of the world's languages, but John McWhorter assures us we probably won't miss them.

Feeble Critiques: Capitalism's Petty Detractors

Last year's financial crisis has been touted as a cataclysm akin to the fall of Communism, but Jagdish Bhagwati argues that such comparisons exaggerate the problem—and free marketers need not apologize for liberal policies.