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March/April 2011

Hu Jintao’s visit to Washington may have seemed bland, but it nonetheless felt like a watershed. As the US angles for a new tack with China, Richard Weitz tells how China’s neighbors have adjusted for Beijing’s mischief and Rafael Marques de Morais details China’s new imperialism in Angola. Plus, arms strategy veteran Richard Perle makes the argument against “Global Zero,” Victor Davis Hanson, James Traub, and others envision AfPak in 2020, Nile Gardiner assesses the special relationship, and more. ... Read More

Yes, Nukes: The Global Zero Utopia

Back in the 1930s, the great powers thought it wise to declare war obsolete. Never mind that it still suited some nations just fine. Fast-forward seventy years and the same illusion stalks the globe again—this time over nuclear weapons.

Strange Bedfellows: War and Minority Rights

War: What is it good for? Well, minority rights for one thing. America's overseas military operations have actually advanced domestic civil rights and liberties.

The New Imperialism: China in Angola

Angola has known exploitation before, but China’s efforts there have no equal in recent memory. Under a corrupt president, the country has become a massive construction site — but everyday Angolans remain hopeless and empty-handed.

Unschooled: How to Better Train Our Nation Builders

Despite a basic shift in US military doctrine after 9/11, the Pentagon has yet to adapt its training to fit its new stability operations, leaving civilian and military personnel unprepared for their tasks.

Decision Time: The Dueling Memoirs of Gerhard Schröder and George W. Bush

In his memoir, President Bush recalls a 2002 meeting in which Chancellor Schröder vowed to support the Iraq War. Schröder says that Bush is “not telling the truth.” If only he had the same standards for his own memoir.

Leaked: What the Mideast Really Thinks of Iran

Thanks to WikiLeaks, it’s now abundantly clear that most Arab leaders want the US to end Iran’s nuclear program. So why do our realist-progressive pundits still think the threat is exaggerated?

AfPak 2020: A Symposium

Where will Afghanistan and Pakistan be in ten years if the US continues on its current course? We put the question to a group of experts. Their answers might surprise you.

Nervous Neighbors: China Finds a Sphere of Influence

ASEAN encourages the sovereignty of its members. That’s probably why China can exploit it so easily. It’s also probably why its members want to hedge Beijing with closer US ties — ties Washington is all to happy to grant.