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September/October 2014

Once again Vladimir Putin’s regime is front and center in World Affairs because we continue to believe that it represents an immediate and multi-dimensional threat to European unity, the transatlantic partnership, and the global order—and that this threat is insufficiently understood, often underestimated, and growing. So we present in this issue several leading experts who give insights into the Kremlin’s motivations, goals, and strategies—along with advice on how we can remedy the present situation in which Putin plays chess while we play checkers. ... Read More

The West and the Rest

After the Cold War, some thought peace and new technology would turn the world into a global village. In reality, it’s full of failed states and emerging powers hostile to the West.

Putin and Europe’s Far Right

If Europe’s far-right, pro-Russia parties gain in upcoming national elections, the EU may divide further and find it very difficult to deter Russian aggression in Ukraine and elsewhere.

China’s Era of Crisis

After Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the People’s Republic of China has now entered its third era, a period to be marked by economic decline, political turbulence, and external belligerence.

Crimea Explained

Seen as a means to distract from Russia’s growing economic woes and rally public support for the Kremlin, the annexation of Crimea and invasion of Ukraine begin to make sense.

The Whitewashing of Poland’s General Jaruzelski

Poland’s decision to give a state funeral to its last communist dictator symbolizes the ambivalence that still clouds the country’s, and by extension Eastern Europe’s, democratic consolidation.

Japan’s New Security Plan

In the face of Chinese territorial aggression and doubts about Washington’s security commitments, Prime Minister Abe of Japan is moving ahead with a controversial new defense policy.

Jihad in the Balkans

Militant Islamists have long had a presence in the Balkans, and many have now traveled to fight in Syria. What happens when they return, battle-hardened, with their European passports?

The Russia-China Gas Deal

Russia and China agreed to a thirty-year, $400 billion energy deal in May. The specifics remain murky, but it’s clear the neighboring powers have sealed a major, long-term partnership.

Unamerican?: The Fate of Deported Non-Citizen Criminals

Having served their time, they would now be free—were they citizens. Instead they were deported to their parents’ homeland, to live in limbo in essentially a foreign country.