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1 Jun 2009

Not The End Of The World: Misreading the Cuban Missile Crisis

Assessing Michael Dobbs's One Minute to Midnight: Kennedy, Khrushchev and Castro on the Brink of Nuclear War.
17 Jun 2014

Women’s Rights in Colombia: Acid Attacks on the Rise

A recent spate of acid attacks has drawn attention to the plight of women in Colombia, where the law has yet to catch up with the violence of the country’s heavily patriarchal social system.
2 Jul 2015

Time for a Rethink?: Libertarians and Foreign Policy

Libertarians must recognize that the world the US faces today is different from the one in which Thomas Jefferson called for peace, commerce, and no entangling alliances.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The lessons of the Iraq War now pass as conventional wisdom, but the intervention-averse policies of the Obama administration in Syria suggest the wrong lessons have been learned.
3 Jan 2012

Editor's Introduction

offers three takes on the seasonal changes (spring? winter?) ...

27 Aug 2014

European Disunion: Cameron, the EU, and the Scots

If the yeas have it on September 18th, David Cameron will be remembered as the prime minister who lost Scotland. He also faces the prospect of being the man who led Britain out of the EU.
3 Jan 2012

Arab Spring or Islamist Winter?

The end of authoritarian regimes is a positive development, but disillusionment has grown in the Middle East and the West as theocratic forces threaten to reverse the progress of last year's revolutions.
28 Oct 2013

No Exit: Why the US Can’t Leave the Middle East

Seeing only dim prospects in Egypt, Libya, and Syria, and recalling the wars of the last decade, most Americans understandably want to quit the Middle East. But that simply isn’t an option.
27 Feb 2013

Erdogan’s Grand Vision: Rise and Decline

Prime Minister Erdogan’s aspirations to restore Turkey’s national glory and to unify the Islamic world have been unhinged by rebellion in Syria and the region’s ferocious rivalries and inflexible dogma.
16 Aug 2013

Why the Brotherhood Failed

After alienating allies and clumsily targeting enemies, the Muslim Brotherhood met its demise after just a year in office, as did Washington’s already weakened influence in Cairo.
30 Apr 2015

Houellebecq’s ‘Submission’: Islam and France’s Malaise

The French novelist Michel Houellebecq often gets labeled as an “Islamophobe,” but his new book seems to express far more anxiety about the French political establishment than Islam.
29 Apr 2015

Japan PM Abe’s Visit to Washington—and California

Prime Minister Abe capped off his Washington visit with a historic address to Congress today, but his four-day visit to the West Coast could be equally critical to his agenda to rebrand Japan.
30 Apr 2015

The New Containment: Undermining Democracy

As the West once used containment to halt the spread of communism, the world’s authoritarians now use it to curtail democracy in the hope of guarding their power and spoils.

Too Many Parties? Governing Britain after the Election

Separatist parties in the UK have so diminished the major ones that mild political chaos, the likes of which British politicians used to mock in places like Italy, could follow next week’s vote.

Caught in the Middle: India, China, and Tibet

The border that separates India and China marks a tense and uncertain boundary between two giants—one communist, one democratic—with Tibet caught precariously in between.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

Americans are unlikely to learn anything from the Iraq War for one simple reason. Rather than subjecting the war to the critical scrutiny it deserves, they are keen to forget it.
19 Dec 2014

Securing Peace Instead of Rewarding Expansion

More than 100 German-speaking experts on Eastern Europe have signed an appeal for a reality-based, and not illusions-guided, Russia policy.
30 Nov 2011

The Candidates and Foreign Policy

To the extent they focus on foreign affairs at all, the current GOP hopefuls differ greatly from their predecessors.
2 Apr 2014

Tunisia at the Crossroads

Tunisia could be an engine for democracy and economic growth south of the Mediterranean, but it needs help from the US to tamp down corrosive instability and radicalization.
30 Apr 2015

Shrinking China: A Demographic Crisis

The question of who will rule Asia in the 21st century, China or India, might already be decided: China’s population may peak by the end of the decade, with economic decline almost sure to follow.
27 Oct 2013

Rights in Russia: Navalny and the Opposition

Vladimir Putin’s regime no longer bothers to varnish its relentless campaign to silence dissent, as evidenced by the brazen Soviet-era show trials and tactics used against Aleksei Navalny and others.
17 Mar 2015

Squaring Cuba's Terror Designation in the Circle of the Law

President Obama won’t be able to mend ties with Cuba until it’s removed from the State Department’s list of terrorism sponsors—a designation that has considerable evidence in its favor.
1 Mar 2015

No Friends but the Mountains: The Fate of the Kurds

The last time the Middle East was in such disarray, the Ottoman Empire was collapsing and the Kurds were subjected to partition and atrocities. They deserve better this time.
28 Jun 2013

US Missile Defense: Closing the Gap

With threats growing in North Korea, Iran, and elsewhere, the US must improve existing missile-defense capabilities in the near term with an eye to developing new technologies as well.
11 Jan 2015

Editor’s Introduction

story of the Arab Spring. Alexander Motyl warns readers not to be fooled ...

28 Jun 2013

Change by Attrition: The Revolution Dies Hard

As the Castro dynasty grows poorer and more desperate, look for the regime to pretend to reform while retaining its totalitarian grip on the tropical island’s politics and economy.
31 Dec 2014

Democracy: Four Reasons to Be Optimistic in 2015

2014 was a bleak year for the development of democracy around the world, but history has shown we are often blind to the democratic possibilities unfolding amidst the turmoil.
6 Jun 2013

North Korea’s Legacy of Terrorism

The US once considered North Korea—guilty of dozens of foreign bombings and thousands of abductions—a terrorism sponsor. The listing lapsed, but the horrendous behavior never did.
1 Jul 2011

1989 and 2011: Compare and Contrast

A comparison of the two great revolutions of our era illuminates the promise and sobering challenges ahead for the Arab Spring.

1 Jun 2009

The Dark Side of Tolerance: British Anti-Semitism

The specter of anti-Semitism is stalking Britain. It is guilt-free and unrestrained by historical literacy. According to a recent survey, many British children believe Auschwitz is a brand of beer.
1 Mar 2015

Let Iraq Die: A Case for Partition

The violence set off by the Islamic State has once again dispelled the myth of a unified Iraq. For those living there, and the outside powers hoping stability will prevail, division is the best option.

The Ukraine Invasion: One Year Later

Vladimir Putin’s aggression against Ukraine is an assault on Western values, legitimacy, and security—not to mention world order. His victims deserve the West’s unambiguous support.
26 Apr 2012

Lines in the Sand: Assad Plays the Sectarian Card

Today’s major world conflicts—autocracy versus democracy; the West versus the China-Russia axis; Iran and its allies versus the US, Israel, and “moderate” Arab states—intersect and collide in Syria, where sectarianism’s ancient hatreds may well tip their outcomes.
1 Mar 2015

Yesterday’s People: Taiwan Votes Against Beijing

In November Taiwan’s ruling party, the Kuomintang, suffered its worst defeat ever in an election that became a referendum on its long-held policies to integrate the island into China.
1 Mar 2009

Zionism and Racism, Again: Durban II

U.S. participation in the United Nation’s Durban Review Conference on Racism, otherwise known as Durban II, would have been a fool’s errand.
7 Oct 2014

Chechnya, Russia’s Forgotten War

The annexation of Crimea earlier this year shored up Vladimir Putin’s falling approval ratings, but the start of the Second Chechen War 15 years ago brought him to power in the first place.
5 Jan 2015

The Hong Kong Moment: Trouble on China’s Periphery

Beijing’s decision to dictate election rules in Hong Kong that favor its preferred candidates has awakened and electrified a democracy movement that had long been silent.
13 Nov 2014

Putin the Unifier

Vladimir Putin’s aggression has established a sense of national identity and common purpose that has long eluded the people of Ukraine. It has also forged an anti-Russian consensus.
1 Mar 2009

Not So Huddled Masses: Multiculturalism and Foreign Policy

Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, America has entered a new era of ethnicity and foreign policy, whose contours are only just now emerging.
27 Aug 2014

Dancing with Dictators: General Jaruzelski’s Revisionists

Poland’s decision to give a state funeral to its last communist dictator symbolizes the ambivalence that still clouds the country’s, and by extension Eastern Europe’s, democratic consolidation.
29 Apr 2013

The Game Changer: Syria, Iran, and Kurdish Independence

The shifting fortunes of Middle Eastern politics have delivered Turkey’s Prime Minister Erdogan and the country’s Kurds to the brink of a lasting settlement.
21 Jan 2015

A Fight for Democracy: Why Ukraine Matters

The US has a profound stake in Ukraine’s future because its struggle for democracy, independence, and territorial integrity has consequences well beyond its borders.
28 Jun 2013

The Illusion of Cuban Reform: Castro Strikes Out

The “reforms” Raúl Castro announced after taking over from his brother Fidel are as comical as they are tragic—a mixed bag of dumb ideas, self-dealing, and more of the same old repression.
5 Jan 2015

State of Mind: A Future Russia

Change will come to today’s nationalistic and conspiratorial Russia, but when, how, and what it will mean are yet unknown in a country whose leaders frequently boast of their nuclear arsenal.
27 Oct 2013

The Next Revolution: A Call for Reconciliation in the Arab World

Toxic divides will deny North Africa’s post-revolutionary states of political, social, and economic progress until national reconciliation unburdens the people of their victimhood and vindictiveness.
1 Mar 2009

Dear Mr. President ... On Good and Evil

P. J. O’Rourke ponders the president’s take on good and evil, and the limits of the olive branch.
5 Jan 2015

The Surrealism of Realism: Misreading the War in Ukraine

When Ukraine started grabbing headlines a year ago, more than a few scholars began writing as if they were experts on the country. Trouble is, they were merely self-serving realists.
1 Mar 2009

Freedom’s Untidy: Democracy Promotion and Its Discontents

The scale of the catastrophe in Iraq not only invites a long, hard stare at the wreckage but ignites the question of what to conclude.
19 Jun 2014

Iran, the New Force for Regional Stability?

Tehran’s mastery of regional geopolitics, coupled with reluctance in Washington, allowed the Assad regime to survive the Arab Spring. The same elements might be in play once again in Iraq.
31 Oct 2012

Breaking from Baghdad: Kurdish Autonomy vs. Maliki’s Manipulation

Given their historical grievances and more recent political warring with Baghdad’s manipulative Maliki government, the Kurds cast a long shadow over the future of a unified Iraq.

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