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1 Mar 2015

No Friends but the Mountains: The Fate of the Kurds

The last time the Middle East was in such disarray, the Ottoman Empire was collapsing and the Kurds were subjected to partition and atrocities. They deserve better this time.
30 Aug 2013

Blue Gold: The Coming Water Wars

Forget global warming and peak oil—the looming wars of this century will be fought over water, that indispensable resource that democracies typically share but strongmen use as a weapon.
5 Mar 2015

The Kim Regime's Atrocities, and the Road Ahead

A powerful UN report gives an authentic accounting of North Korea's systematic abuse of its citizens—and a realistic roadmap on how to stop it.
17 Jun 2014

Editor’s Introduction

Russia” with a new strategy of containment. It would be reassuring to know ...

5 Jan 2015

Broken Peaces: The Israeli-Palestinian Hyperconflict

After twenty years of failed attempts, it is time to abandon the belief that a “local” agreement between the Israelis and the Palestinians would pacify the region.
27 Aug 2014

Editor’s Introduction

plot, the July 2009 Raleigh Group conspiracy, the 2009 New York City ...

5 Jan 2015

The Hong Kong Moment: Trouble on China’s Periphery

Beijing’s decision to dictate election rules in Hong Kong that favor its preferred candidates has awakened and electrified a democracy movement that had long been silent.
26 Feb 2014

Letter from Cuba: To Embargo or Not

Is the US embargo against Cuba a Cold War relic or an effective tool? A recent visit suggests that the Castro regime’s tyrannical imbecility still justifies continued sanctions.
28 Jun 2013

Islamic Terror: Decentralized, Franchised, Global

As President Obama scales back on the War on Terror, al-Qaeda and its mutations have decentralized and spread, and by now are poised to strike in unexpected places.
5 Jan 2015

Barbarians at the Gates: A Postcard from Erbil

The people of Erbil, in Iraqi Kurdistan, find themselves precariously perched at the crossroads of history once again, wary of local enemies and foreign friends alike.
1 May 2011

Letter from the Editor: May/June 2011

the earth’s surface. New and deadly faults blindsided the scientific world when they wreaked havoc in New Zealand and Haiti in the past two years, ...

31 Oct 2014

The Stubborn South: Why Seoul Needs to Mend Ties with Japan

While Tokyo bulks up against Chinese aggression, South Korea insists on prolonging historical grievances with the Japanese. It’s time for Seoul to put strategic interests first.

Beijing Inc?: The Chinese Aren’t Coming—They’re Here

The rise of Chinese investments in the US has Republicans and Democrats alike worried about the trend’s security and economic implications, not to mention Beijing’s long-term intentions.
12 Sep 2014

Putin Attacks the West's Soft Underbelly

According to Tocqueville, democratic countries have trouble fathoming how un-democratic countries truly operate. Vladimir Putin has crafted his Ukraine policy to capitalize on this weakness.
13 Nov 2014

Putin the Unifier

Vladimir Putin’s aggression has established a sense of national identity and common purpose that has long eluded the people of Ukraine. It has also forged an anti-Russian consensus.
27 Aug 2014

All Politics Are Local: Crimea Explained

Seen as a means to distract from Russia’s growing economic woes and rally public support for the Kremlin, the annexation of Crimea and invasion of Ukraine begin to make sense.

Jihad in the Balkans: The Next Generation

Militant Islamists have long had a presence in the Balkans, and many have now traveled to fight in Syria. What happens when they return, battle-hardened, with their European passports?
31 Oct 2014

The Jew of Nations: The Global Demonization of Israel

A new book explores the many reasons why perceptions of Israel have shifted so dramatically over the years, turning the Jewish state from an underdog into a global villain.
25 Sep 2014

Did the West Provoke Putin? Apologists and Facts

As Putin attacks Ukraine, stalks other unfortunate neighbors, and undermines global order, his apologists in the West rewrite history to excuse the Kremlin's aggression.
27 Aug 2014

As the World Turns: Will the West Prevail?

After the Cold War, some thought peace and new technology would turn the world into a global village. In reality, it’s full of failed states and emerging powers hostile to the West.
19 Dec 2014

Securing Peace Instead of Rewarding Expansion

More than 100 German-speaking experts on Eastern Europe have signed an appeal for a reality-based, and not illusions-guided, Russia policy.
18 Apr 2014

America’s Purpose and Role in a Changed World

The lessons of the last ten years are quite simple: Even a major superpower has to base its policies on a broader alliance, not just for military purposes but also for political and moral ones.
31 Oct 2012

What Are They Thinking? A Study of Youth in Three Post-Soviet States

Nadia Diuk’s new book—a survey of youth in Russia, Ukraine, and Azerbaijan—is a must-read for those studying the former Soviet Union and youth movements fighting dictators around the globe.
7 Oct 2014

Chechnya, Russia’s Forgotten War

The annexation of Crimea earlier this year shored up Vladimir Putin’s falling approval ratings, but the start of the Second Chechen War 15 years ago brought him to power in the first place.
21 Nov 2014

Senator Calls For Strategy to Confront Putin

“Events in Ukraine are a direct challenge to the entire U.S.-led international order,” says US Senator Portman in a speech delivered to the Senate. The Ohio senator has called for significant military aid to Ukraine, stressing the importance of ongoing US support.
31 Oct 2014

Editor’s Introduction

The dark uncertainty that characterizes international affairs was (strange as it might seem) captured in a recent remark by Vice President Joe Biden, who observed that the world order we’ve known for nearly seventy years seems now to be “literally fraying at the seams.” We here at World Affairs feel that literal fraying, too. Yet we also believe that its continuation is not predetermined, which is why we’ve published an excerpt from Michael Zantovsky’s forthcoming Havel: A Life. Zantovsky (currently the Czech Republic’s ambassador to the Court of St. James’s) was a friend and comrade-in-arms of Vaclav Havel’s during the days when Charter 77 helped cause a different kind of fraying—of the loathsome fabric of the Soviet Union.
17 Jun 2014

Why ‘Reset’ Failed: Diplomacy with Rogues Rarely Works

The example of US-Russian relations today is a reminder that the history of diplomacy is littered with cases of the wishful and gullible being outwitted by the cunning and dishonest.
2 Sep 2014

Bosnia's Divides, Still Unbridged

Two decades after the Bosnian War, ethnic divisions still dominate politics in a region where Vladimir Putin is subverting the West on a lesser-known front.
4 Sep 2014

The Case for Berlin: Bringing Germany Back to the West

Germany’s response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is a stark reminder that it has lost its strategic compass. If the West hopes to counter such aggression, Berlin’s foreign policy has to grow up.
24 Jul 2014

Former President Klaus's Flawed Defense of Crimea's Annexation

Former Czech President Vaclav Klaus is probably one of the most prominent foreign figures to defend the annexation of Crimea. That makes his flawed arguments particularly disconcerting.
27 Aug 2014

Dancing with Dictators: General Jaruzelski’s Revisionists

Poland’s decision to give a state funeral to its last communist dictator symbolizes the ambivalence that still clouds the country’s, and by extension Eastern Europe’s, democratic consolidation.
31 Oct 2014

A Sad State of Affairs: The Kerry Record

The secretary of state’s one-sided, wrong-headed, and ill-fated attempt to negotiate an Israel-Hamas deal this summer should come as no surprise to anyone familiar with his track record.

A Break with Beijing?: Hanoi Considers Its Options

Hanoi’s days of deference to China may be ending—and a new strategic alignment emerging—in the wake of increased tensions between over Beijing’s aggressive maritime claims.

Barbarism 2014: On Religious Cleansing by Islamists

Christians and others are being savaged by a gruesome campaign of beheadings, kidnappings, torture, and forced marriages across the Islamic world.
27 Aug 2014

Yes, Russia Matters: Putin’s Guerrilla Strategy

Russia today is not as strong as the Soviet Union once was, but Vladimir Putin has used energy and financial leverage, along with propaganda, to snatch power from the jaws of weakness.

China’s Third Era: The End of Reform, Growth, and Stability

After Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the People’s Republic of China has now entered its third era, a period to be marked by economic decline, political turbulence, and external belligerence.
1 Jul 2014

NATO Should Buy French-built Warships

France is putting the finishing touches on two warships built for Putin’s Russia. If NATO were to buy or lease the ships instead, it would be a win-win-win for the Atlantic Alliance.
1 Jul 2010

All Out: China Turns on the Charm

The Heritage Foundation's Helle C. Dale tells how the U.S. is struggling to keep up with China's massive promotional efforts around the world.
18 Apr 2014

America’s Purpose and Role in a Changed World

One important question Americans face today is whether the retrenchment of President Obama’s foreign policy is a traditional correction after years of maximalism or something less healthy.
17 Jun 2014

Women’s Rights in Colombia: Acid Attacks on the Rise

A recent spate of acid attacks has drawn attention to the plight of women in Colombia, where the law has yet to catch up with the violence of the country’s heavily patriarchal social system.
24 Dec 2012

The Coming Surge of Cuban Refugees

A new Cuban law that allows its citizens to travel abroad will likely create a surge of travel—and political refugees—to the US. And Washington appears oblivious to the consequences.
1 May 2014

Beyond Crimea: What Vladimir Putin Really Wants

As Vladimir Putin looks to gain further control of his neighbors, the West must revitalize its commitment to democracy via economic, moral, and security assistance.
10 Mar 2014

Turkey on the Brink: Will Elections Undo Erdogan?

With his foreign policy in tatters and his domestic popularity weakened by corruption charges and attacks on critics, Prime Minister Erdogan could be headed for a major setback.
17 Jun 2014

Inside Vladimir Putin’s Mind: Looking Back in Anger

Even if President Putin can show the Russian people inconsistencies in Western foreign policy, it hardly justifies his bizarre desire to remake their country as a new Byzantium.
27 Aug 2014

European Disunion: Cameron, the EU, and the Scots

If the yeas have it on September 18th, David Cameron will be remembered as the prime minister who lost Scotland. He also faces the prospect of being the man who led Britain out of the EU.
16 Apr 2014

The Once and Future Threat: Al-Qaeda Is Hardly Dead

The Obama administration has made much of the demise of al-Qaeda in recent years, but Osama bin Laden’s network is remarkably resilient—and remains a deadly threat.
1 Sep 2010

Innocence Abroad: The Tea Party's Search for Foreign Policy

What's the Tea Party's foreign policy? Well, it's a difficult question on two counts: There doesn't seem to be a Tea Party foreign policy, and, on inspection, there doesn't seem to be a Tea Party . . .
10 Apr 2014

The Shifting Health of Shaker Aamer

Gitmo prisoner Shaker Aamer has stirred up controversy again by his efforts to return to the UK rather than Saudi Arabia, but the manipulative leader may have cried wolf one time too many.
18 Aug 2014

No Winners in Unhinged, Disintegrating Syria

If there’s any hope for Syria, it will only come after all sides realize no one is winning the current conflict, or will win, and that the republic established in 1946 is no more.
26 Feb 2014

A Losing Game: America’s Postwar Arabists

The sentiments of Truman’s State Department toward the Middle East are well documented. Hugh Wilford’s engaging new book convincingly explores similar sentiments in the early CIA.

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