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17 Jun 2014

Women’s Rights in Colombia: Acid Attacks on the Rise

A recent spate of acid attacks has drawn attention to the plight of women in Colombia, where the law has yet to catch up with the violence of the country’s heavily patriarchal social system.
28 Oct 2013

No Exit: Why the US Can’t Leave the Middle East

Seeing only dim prospects in Egypt, Libya, and Syria, and recalling the wars of the last decade, most Americans understandably want to quit the Middle East. But that simply isn’t an option.
30 Nov 2011

The Candidates and Foreign Policy

To the extent they focus on foreign affairs at all, the current GOP hopefuls differ greatly from their predecessors.
17 Jun 2014

Tougher Sanctions Now: Putin’s Delusional Quest for Empire

In light of Moscow’s aggression in Ukraine and contempt for the international community, it’s time for Washington to lead an effort to impose sanctions that will actually punish Putin’s regime.
3 Jul 2014

Can Hezbollah Sustain Assad and Itself?

With the fighting in Iraq drawing large numbers of skilled Shia militiamen back home, Hezbollah might be forced to send even more aid to the Assad regime, weakening security at home.
5 Oct 2015

Greek Politics: Economic Crisis or Crisis of Democracy?

Energized by the country’s economic crisis, Greece’s political extremes are violently rocking the cradle of democracy and threatening its longstanding political order.

Détente Plus?: How Should the West Deal with Russia?

The problem with the “realist” approach advocated by Leslie Gelb and others is that it is filled with wishful thinking and contradictions that ignore the realities of Putin’s Russia.
16 Jul 2015

Iran Is No ‘Strategic Ally’

The former British ambassador to the US has written that shifting interests in the Middle East make Iran a rising “strategic ally,” especially in the wake of the nuclear deal. He’s wrong.
5 Oct 2015

A Path to the Sea: China’s Pakistan Plan

Dwarfing recent US aid and foreign investment, the $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor could be a game-changer for the region, and even make Beijing a two-ocean power.

Shattered Hopes: A Farewell to European Arms Control?

Even before the Ukraine crisis, European arms control was in trouble. Now, with the tensions raised, existing treaties could easily fail, without any effort made to renew or replace them.
1 Jun 2009

After The Fall: 1989, Twenty Years On

Joshua Muravchik reflects on the twentieth anniversary of 1989, a tumultuous and decisive year.

The Dark Side of Tolerance: British Anti-Semitism

The specter of anti-Semitism is stalking Britain. It is guilt-free and unrestrained by historical literacy. According to a recent survey, many British children believe Auschwitz is a brand of beer.
23 Mar 2015

Editor’s Introduction

the question of Iraq’s very existence as a single state, concluding that it doesn’t have much of a future: “If Iraq somehow manages to survive its ...

30 Aug 2013

Misreading Iran’s Elections: Iranian Infighting and American Narcissism

President Rouhani might appear relatively reform-minded, but after three decades of disappointments by other Iranian “reformers,” outsiders should know better than to be optimistic.
1 Mar 2011

Nervous Neighbors: China Finds a Sphere of Influence

ASEAN encourages the sovereignty of its members. That’s probably why China can exploit it so easily. It’s also probably why its members want to hedge Beijing with closer US ties — ties Washington is all to happy to grant.
31 Oct 2014

Abbott Agonistes: Year One for Australia’s Prime Minister

No one expected Tony Abbott to be a Reagan-style fiscal hawk, but conservatives hoped he would at least clean up the mess left by previous governments. One year in, he has yet to make good.
28 Nov 2012

A Gaza Postmortem

After the Gaza cease-fire, the US-Israeli relationship looks stronger, Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the Palestinian Authority look weaker, and Egypt remains an unknown quantity.
28 Jun 2013

US Missile Defense: Closing the Gap

With threats growing in North Korea, Iran, and elsewhere, the US must improve existing missile-defense capabilities in the near term with an eye to developing new technologies as well.
27 Feb 2013

Erdogan’s Grand Vision: Rise and Decline

Prime Minister Erdogan’s aspirations to restore Turkey’s national glory and to unify the Islamic world have been unhinged by rebellion in Syria and the region’s ferocious rivalries and inflexible dogma.
29 Sep 2014

ISIS Jihadists Returning to Europe

The Islamic State didn’t initially target the West, but that has changed—and hundreds of jihadists will soon be returning home with their European passports.
28 Jun 2013

Change by Attrition: The Revolution Dies Hard

As the Castro dynasty grows poorer and more desperate, look for the regime to pretend to reform while retaining its totalitarian grip on the tropical island’s politics and economy.
6 Jun 2013

North Korea’s Legacy of Terrorism

The US once considered North Korea—guilty of dozens of foreign bombings and thousands of abductions—a terrorism sponsor. The listing lapsed, but the horrendous behavior never did.
2 Jul 2015

Continental Drift: Europe at a Crossroads

The future of the EU depends on its leaders adapting to harsh realities—such as the fact that the bigger and more integrated the union gets, the less appealing it seems to be to its citizens.
19 Dec 2014

Securing Peace Instead of Rewarding Expansion

More than 100 German-speaking experts on Eastern Europe have signed an appeal for a reality-based, and not illusions-guided, Russia policy.
30 Apr 2015

Houellebecq’s ‘Submission’: Islam and France’s Malaise

The French novelist Michel Houellebecq often gets labeled as an “Islamophobe,” but his new book seems to express far more anxiety about the French political establishment than Islam.
1 Mar 2011

Strange Bedfellows: War and Minority Rights

War: What is it good for? Well, minority rights for one thing. America's overseas military operations have actually advanced domestic civil rights and liberties.
1 Sep 2011

Ten Years Later

“The shock of 9/11 was not, in the end, enough to heal the US body politic. Ten years ago, Americans wondered, in unison: ‘Why do they hate us?’ Today, we need to ask: ‘Why do we hate each other?’”
18 Aug 2014

No Winners in Unhinged, Disintegrating Syria

If there’s any hope for Syria, it will only come after all sides realize no one is winning the current conflict, or will win, and that the republic established in 1946 is no more.
29 Apr 2015

Japan PM Abe’s Visit to Washington—and California

Prime Minister Abe capped off his Washington visit with a historic address to Congress today, but his four-day visit to the West Coast could be equally critical to his agenda to rebrand Japan.
1 Jul 2010

Letter from the Editor: July/August 2010

in Iraq. Knowing that the project was weighing heavily on him, it came as no surprise that he decided to commit his full attention to completing ...

1 Mar 2010

Fearful Asymmetry: Reading the Goldstone Report

Despite its flaws, the Goldstone Report points up the fundamental contradiction between the needs of great powers and the demands of international law.
1 Jan 2011

Big Boom: Robert Pape Remakes Terrorism Studies

Meet Robert Pape, the man whose empirical research has helped reshape terrorism studies as we know it.
2 Sep 2014

World Affairs Statement on the Murder of Journalist Steven Sotloff by ISIS

Steven Sotloff was a contributor to World Affairs. He was a courageous and dedicated journalist. President Obama must rally the world’s civilized nations to condemn and end ISIS’s reign of terror. A statement from the publisher/editor of World Affairs.
30 Apr 2015

The New Containment: Undermining Democracy

As the West once used containment to halt the spread of communism, the world’s authoritarians now use it to curtail democracy in the hope of guarding their power and spoils.

Too Many Parties? Governing Britain after the Election

Separatist parties in the UK have so diminished the major ones that mild political chaos, the likes of which British politicians used to mock in places like Italy, could follow next week’s vote.

Caught in the Middle: India, China, and Tibet

The border that separates India and China marks a tense and uncertain boundary between two giants—one communist, one democratic—with Tibet caught precariously in between.
1 May 2011

Lost in the Levant: Lebanon Reappraised

In The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Beirut Daily Star editor Michael Young offers a timely and beautifully written accounting of Lebanon's struggle for stability amid political and religious diversity and extremism.
30 Aug 2013

Justice Squandered: Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge Tribunal

The UN’s incompetent attempt to bring former Khmer Rouge officials to justice has, after ten years and $209 million spent, convicted just one member of Pol Pot’s killing machine.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US failed to collaborate with opposition forces inside Iraq before the invasion and thus blundered into an occupation of a country of which we knew little.
17 Mar 2015

Squaring Cuba's Terror Designation in the Circle of the Law

President Obama won’t be able to mend ties with Cuba until it’s removed from the State Department’s list of terrorism sponsors—a designation that has considerable evidence in its favor.
30 Apr 2015

Shrinking China: A Demographic Crisis

The question of who will rule Asia in the 21st century, China or India, might already be decided: China’s population may peak by the end of the decade, with economic decline almost sure to follow.
1 Mar 2010

Saviors & Sovereigns: The Rise and Fall of Humanitarianism

Let's face it: liberals and conservatives alike are running out of explanations for our role in the world.
1 Mar 2009

Freedom’s Untidy: Democracy Promotion and Its Discontents

The scale of the catastrophe in Iraq not only invites a long, hard stare at the wreckage but ignites the question of what to conclude.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US intervention in Iraq, as it was carried out, was a mistake. But that is only part of the lesson, and it would be erroneous to conclude that the case of Iraq makes all intervention mistaken.
25 Mar 2008

Freedom Fighter Called “Terrorist” by INS

for destruction by insurgents for “collaboration.” He wants to return to Iraq ...

1 Jul 2011

1989 and 2011: Compare and Contrast

A comparison of the two great revolutions of our era illuminates the promise and sobering challenges ahead for the Arab Spring.

17 Sep 2012

The Looming WMD Crisis in Syria

As warfare and instability continue to rattle Syria, the possibility that terrorists could acquire the regime's chemical and biological weapons is getting disturbingly more likely.
27 Dec 2011

The Next al-Qaeda? Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Future of Terrorism in South Asia

Lashkar-e-Taiba has morphed from a militia operating in Kashmir to a regional broker with designs on becoming the next global terror network.
30 Aug 2012

The Coming Collapse: Authoritarians in China and Russia Face an Endgame

Russia and China—either (or both) could collapse soon. Yet neither the president nor his challenger seem alert to, or prepared for, such a possibility.
27 Aug 2014

Dancing with Dictators: General Jaruzelski’s Revisionists

Poland’s decision to give a state funeral to its last communist dictator symbolizes the ambivalence that still clouds the country’s, and by extension Eastern Europe’s, democratic consolidation.

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