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23 Jan 2014

Euromaidan: Ukraine’s Self-Organizing Revolution

Unlike the Orange Revolution of 2004, the ongoing Euromaidan protests seek long-term solutions for Ukraine, built not by any one leader but by individuals working at the grassroots level.
31 Jan 2014

New Hope for Central African Republic?

The new interim president of the Central African Republic is said to favor reconciliation. Could her election, coupled with assistance from abroad, help to end a year of deeply divisive warfare?
17 Jun 2014

Why ‘Reset’ Failed: Diplomacy with Rogues Rarely Works

The example of US-Russian relations today is a reminder that the history of diplomacy is littered with cases of the wishful and gullible being outwitted by the cunning and dishonest.
27 Jun 2012

China and India Today: Diplomats Jostle, Militaries Prepare

The delicate and increasingly tense China-India rivalry is reflected in the countries’ military preparations, alliances, and diplomatic maneuvering with neighbors and world powers alike.
1 Nov 2010

Shadow Wars: Debating Cyber 'Disarmament'

No less a figure than President Obama has now acknowledged the existence of Web-based warfare. So shouldn't there be cyber war treaties? NPR's Tom Gjelten explores the often nebulous world of cyber 'disarmament.'
30 Jul 2013

The Syria Quagmire

The longer the war in Syria drags on, the more complex it gets, with an ever-expanding cast of players staking claims. Americans are right to see little hope in a US intervention.
29 Dec 2013

Beyond Snowden: An NSA Reality Check

Edward Snowden’s leaks have fixated the media and the public on privacy and espionage, but the larger and more complex debate on protecting American security in the 21st century has been wanting.
27 Oct 2013

Erdogan’s Muse: The School of Necip Fazil Kisakurek

Protests in Turkey have laid bare Prime Minister Erdogan’s picture of his country’s past and his vision for the future, drawn in part from the writings of a poet with a penchant for authoritarianism.
26 Feb 2014

Isle of Light: A Look Back at the Boat People and the European Left

After the fall of South Vietnam, Paris’s antiwar left mobilized to condemn and partially remedy atrocities committed by the communist victors whose cause some had even championed.

Orphaned by History: A Child Welfare Crisis in Romania

The Ceausescu regime fell more than two decades ago, but its grisly social-engineering projects have left behind scores of damaged Romanians and a culture of child welfare neglect.
27 Oct 2013

Forced Exodus: Christians in the Middle East

In Syria and other parts of the Middle East, militant Islamists have launched a purge of Arab Christians from cities and towns where they have flourished since the dawn of Christianity.
30 Aug 2013

Dispatch from Armenia: The Not So Frozen War

Some “little wars” deserve greater attention. The so-called frozen conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, which is pushing Armenia closer to Iran, is one of them.
29 Dec 2013

Conflicting Claims: China, Japan, Taiwan on Edge

China’s aggressive territorial claims in the South China Sea are similar to those made in the East China Sea—and have entangled China, Japan, and Taiwan in an intractable and tense standoff.
28 Jun 2013

Islamic Terror: Decentralized, Franchised, Global

As President Obama scales back on the War on Terror, al-Qaeda and its mutations have decentralized and spread, and by now are poised to strike in unexpected places.
28 Oct 2013

Editor’s Introduction

the false spring. Romdhani has written a penetrating and provocative piece ...

26 Feb 2014

China and Russia: An Axis of Weak States

Economic weakness has driven Vladimir Putin’s Russia into a “strategic entente” with the Chinese, who in turn get a powerful global ally. The alliance could prove formidable for the West.

After the Fall: Russia in Search of a New Ideology

The origins of Putin’s authoritarian approach come less from Stalinism and more from the regime the Bolsheviks overthrew. The approach may be popular today, but will it work in the longer run?
1 Sep 2009

Talibanistan: The Talibs at Home

If you think the Talibs aren't the rainmakers in AfPak these days, try to collect a measly debt—much less win a war—without them. Our correspondent did. (And he still hasn't heard from Western Union.)
20 Dec 2013

It’s Time to Aid North Korea’s Dissidents

As accounts of atrocities in North Korea’s heinous prison camps become impossible to ignore, the West must join with defector networks to bolster the resistance.
27 Feb 2013

The Politics of Apology: Hollande and Algeria

France and Algeria have always had a close but tense relationship. Today the two find common cause fighting Islamists, yet the ghosts of their colonial past continue to haunt the present.
1 Jul 2010

The Broken Link: What Peace Won't Fix

New Republic correspondent and World Affairs blogger James Kirchick argues against the folly of linkage—i.e., the assumption that fixing the peace process will somehow cure all of the Middle East's other ailments.
1 Nov 2010

Saying the Unsayable: Revisiting International Censorship

Freedom House's Arch Puddington and Christopher Walker review the innovative ways that oppressive governments, shady moguls, and other actors strong-arm journalists and NGOs into not publicizing politically sensitive information.
29 Dec 2013

Editor’s Introduction: In Hanoi, Going Forward and Backward

propaganda coup. In the early spring of 1966, as he prepared for what he ...

Politics in Russia: The Kremlin’s Troubles

Before the Moscow mayoral election, Aleksei Navalny was a rising star in Russia’s fragmented opposition. By the time it was over, he had in effect become its leader. The Kremlin’s plan has gone awry.
1 Jul 2011

Letter from the Editor: July/August 2011

and Central Asia Revolution Democracy Arab Spring ...

29 Dec 2013

The Alcatraz Gang: Eleven American POWs in Hanoi’s Notorious Camp

Alvin Townley’s book is the first to tell the story of the eleven American POWs who were dispatched to a dingy, secret prison camp in Hanoi to endure unspeakable torture for their defiance.
22 Jan 2013

China’s Aid to Cambodia Ignores Rights Abuses

When Cambodia applies for Western aid, it gets an earful about the country's human rights violations—which are dire and getting worse. Funding from Beijing carries no such baggage.
1 Mar 2011

Yes, Nukes: The Global Zero Utopia

Back in the 1930s, the great powers thought it wise to declare war obsolete. Never mind that it still suited some nations just fine. Fast-forward seventy years and the same illusion stalks the globe again—this time over nuclear weapons.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US intervention in Iraq, as it was carried out, was a mistake. But that is only part of the lesson, and it would be erroneous to conclude that the case of Iraq makes all intervention mistaken.
27 Feb 2013

A Taste of Freedom: Burma’s Guarded Optimism

Burma’s new leaders have introduced genuine but tentative reforms that have sparked a new optimism among the youth and a level of public discourse unthinkable only a year ago.
30 Aug 2013

Central Europe’s Velvet Power: Can It Reinvigorate EU Foreign Policy?

Having shaken off the Soviet yoke, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia have made significant political and economic progress. Now can they make their mark in the EU?
3 Jan 2012

What Now? Saying Good-Bye to the Peace Process Illusion

After a tumultuous year in Israeli-Palestinian relations, it's time to admit that the "peace process" negotiation model has become a diplomatic delusion.
29 Dec 2013

The Art of Diplomacy: Exhibitions and National Promotion

Anxious to distract from negative economic news and political unrest, European countries like Spain, Greece, and Italy are making a push for cultural diplomacy in the United States.
30 Aug 2013

Blue Gold: The Coming Water Wars

Forget global warming and peak oil—the looming wars of this century will be fought over water, that indispensable resource that democracies typically share but strongmen use as a weapon.
27 Feb 2013

Cuba’s Health-Care Diplomacy: The Business of Humanitarianism

Cuba’s regime might look like a relic of the Cold War, but one of its longstanding programs—outsourcing health-care professionals to other countries—remains alive and well.
2 Nov 2011

Flip-Flop War: Libya’s Punk Revolution

The fighters who toppled Qaddafi were poorly organized, but their victory could signal a new type of insurgency warfare.
30 Dec 2012

The Last Liberal: The Legacy of Joe Lieberman

Some say Joe Lieberman turned his back on his fellow Democrats, but as the Connecticut senator retires, it seems, in retrospect, that American liberals changed, not him.
28 Oct 2013

Dispatch from Syria: Can Rebels Learn to Govern?

Whether helping to run refugee camps or debating political models, some Syrians in rebel-held areas are testing what shape a post-Assad government might take in theory and in practice.
20 Mar 2013

Can the UN Stop Kim’s Human Rights Crimes?

The UN’s special rapporteur for human rights in North Korea is only the latest to urge the body to take action against the regime’s widespread abuses and crimes. But will anything really be done?
28 Oct 2013

Terror in Burma: Buddhists vs. Muslims

What began as a nationalist movement in Burma in the 1990s has morphed into an anti-Muslim bigotry and terror campaign being waged by zealots within the country’s Buddhist majority.

The Silence of Surrender: Erdogan’s War on Independent Media

Prime Minister Erdogan’s successful campaign to cripple Turkey’s top media mogul illustrates the government’s determination to subvert free expression and dissent.
1 Mar 2010

Saviors & Sovereigns: The Rise and Fall of Humanitarianism

Let's face it: liberals and conservatives alike are running out of explanations for our role in the world.
30 Aug 2013

Editor’s Introduction

along the lines of its Founder’s intent. As part of its full menu, ...

Misreading Iran’s Elections: Iranian Infighting and American Narcissism

President Rouhani might appear relatively reform-minded, but after three decades of disappointments by other Iranian “reformers,” outsiders should know better than to be optimistic.

Tensions in Tehran: Iran’s Mullahs vs. the Revolutionary Guards

Iran’s presidential elections sometimes look democratic but they’re best understood as a mafia-style competition between the regime’s most powerful blocs, the mullahs and the Revolutionary Guards.
1 Sep 2009

The Big Story: Our Embattled Media

News coverage of the Iraq War will be studied by future journalists and officers alike. ABC's Marcus Wilford offers an initial assessment of what worked—and what didn't.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

One of the central lessons of the Iraq War is that regime change necessitates nation building, a process that is hardly automatic no matter how quickly a despot may be deposed.
1 Sep 2010

Deja Vu All Over Again: Are We Repeating Vietnam?

Rufus Phillips watched Vietnam unfold from the beginning, serving there from 1954 to 1968. Now he's taking his perspective to Afghanistan, which he visited last year to aid with elections in Kabul.
1 Jan 2011

Spoiler Alert: What Syria's President Really Wants

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad wants to play every one of his neighbors (not to mention the West) for all they're worth.
28 Jun 2013

Australia’s Next Prime Minister? An Interview with Tony Abbott

Conservative Tony Abbott has gotten the attention of Australia’s political elite and, with his ruling opponents in disarray, appears well positioned to win September’s election. How would he govern?

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