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27 Aug 2014

China’s Third Era: The End of Reform, Growth, and Stability

After Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the People’s Republic of China has now entered its third era, a period to be marked by economic decline, political turbulence, and external belligerence.
18 Apr 2014

America’s Purpose and Role in a Changed World

What’s next for US foreign policy? Recalibration or retreat? Adjustment or withdrawal? All tough tasks, even in good times; harder still if the world thinks we’re not even up for the fight.
1 Jul 2011

Letter from the Editor: July/August 2011

and Central Asia Revolution Democracy Arab Spring ...

26 Feb 2014

Letter from Cuba: To Embargo or Not

Is the US embargo against Cuba a Cold War relic or an effective tool? A recent visit suggests that the Castro regime’s tyrannical imbecility still justifies continued sanctions.
30 Jul 2013

The Syria Quagmire

The longer the war in Syria drags on, the more complex it gets, with an ever-expanding cast of players staking claims. Americans are right to see little hope in a US intervention.
26 Apr 2012

Israel and Iran: An Attack Might Be Necessary, but Not Yet

The US, Israel, and its allies cannot allow a nuclear Iran, but any military action should be US-led and only occur if all diplomatic, economic, and covert tactical options are exhausted.
1 Sep 2011

The Defector’s Tale: Inside North Korea’s Secret Economy

The “Royal Court Economy,” begun as a stopgap as Soviet funding dried up, has grown into a hidden mechanism to keep the Kim dynasty in power.

18 Apr 2014

Editor’s Introduction

the staying power of al-Qaeda in the wake of the “Arab Spring,” the departure ...

Brazil’s Troubles: World Cup Runneth Over

When Brazil landed this summer’s World Cup seven years ago, its fortunes were on the up and its leaders intended to showcase their country’s growing importance. Things have not gone as planned.
23 Jan 2014

Euromaidan: Ukraine’s Self-Organizing Revolution

Unlike the Orange Revolution of 2004, the ongoing Euromaidan protests seek long-term solutions for Ukraine, built not by any one leader but by individuals working at the grassroots level.
1 Jul 2011

Persons of Interest: Britain Learns from Ex-Islamists

Two former extremists prove just how much the UK learns from its reformed enemies (and why the US should do the same).

28 Feb 2012

It’s Not Just Al-Qaeda: Stability in the Most Dangerous Region

In a region defined by historic and violent divides, hostile intent, and nukes, the US and NATO have no viable alternative but to stay the course. 
31 Jan 2014

New Hope for Central African Republic?

The new interim president of the Central African Republic is said to favor reconciliation. Could her election, coupled with assistance from abroad, help to end a year of deeply divisive warfare?
30 Dec 2012

First Strike: US Cyber Warriors Seize the Offensive

The US has abandoned its previous dependence on defensive cyber strategies and has shifted into high gear with the aim of developing superior first-strike capacities.
27 Oct 2013

Erdogan’s Muse: The School of Necip Fazil Kisakurek

Protests in Turkey have laid bare Prime Minister Erdogan’s picture of his country’s past and his vision for the future, drawn in part from the writings of a poet with a penchant for authoritarianism.
24 Aug 2014

Las Bandas Criminales Venezolanas: Guerreros de la Revolución Cultural

posible resistencia, en junio de 2009 se prohibió la venta de armas a la ...

15 Dec 2011

War Babies: The Balkans’ New Lost Generation

Years after the tumultuous wars of the region, life in the Balkans remains complicated and tense—especially for the young.
29 Dec 2013

Beyond Snowden: An NSA Reality Check

Edward Snowden’s leaks have fixated the media and the public on privacy and espionage, but the larger and more complex debate on protecting American security in the 21st century has been wanting.
28 Jun 2013

Islamic Terror: Decentralized, Franchised, Global

As President Obama scales back on the War on Terror, al-Qaeda and its mutations have decentralized and spread, and by now are poised to strike in unexpected places.
17 Jun 2014

A Sanctions Primer: What Happens to the Targeted?

Despite Vladimir Putin’s cavalier dismissal of sanctions, the measures could well undermine his rule if ordinary citizens are burdened by efforts to target Putin’s crony and criminal gang.
1 Nov 2010

West Meets East: Two New Versions of the Cold War

The Cold War: Is it finally over? Walter Laqueur reviews two new histories of the epic struggle of the 20th century — one Western, one Russian.
2 Nov 2011

Flip-Flop War: Libya’s Punk Revolution

The fighters who toppled Qaddafi were poorly organized, but their victory could signal a new type of insurgency warfare.
18 Apr 2014

Kremlin Values: Putin’s Strategic Conservatism

Observers often accuse Vladimir Putin of practicing unscrupulous realpolitik, but in fact he has learned to exploit many conservative values the Soviets once tried to subvert around the world.
27 Oct 2013

Forced Exodus: Christians in the Middle East

In Syria and other parts of the Middle East, militant Islamists have launched a purge of Arab Christians from cities and towns where they have flourished since the dawn of Christianity.
1 Dec 2009

Phony War: Afghanistan and the Democrats

Most Americans in 2003 thought that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were complementary theaters. Yet a brief review of the two wars not only suggests that such a view is mistaken, but also that it is disingenuous...
28 Oct 2013

The Silence of Surrender: Erdogan’s War on Independent Media

Prime Minister Erdogan’s successful campaign to cripple Turkey’s top media mogul illustrates the government’s determination to subvert free expression and dissent.
28 Oct 2013

Editor’s Introduction

the false spring. Romdhani has written a penetrating and provocative piece ...

26 Feb 2014

Isle of Light: A Look Back at the Boat People and the European Left

After the fall of South Vietnam, Paris’s antiwar left mobilized to condemn and partially remedy atrocities committed by the communist victors whose cause some had even championed.

Orphaned by History: A Child Welfare Crisis in Romania

The Ceausescu regime fell more than two decades ago, but its grisly social-engineering projects have left behind scores of damaged Romanians and a culture of child welfare neglect.
22 Jan 2013

China’s Aid to Cambodia Ignores Rights Abuses

When Cambodia applies for Western aid, it gets an earful about the country's human rights violations—which are dire and getting worse. Funding from Beijing carries no such baggage.
1 Sep 2009

The Ugly American: A Rhodes Scholar Goes South

The New Republic's James Kirchick chronicles the misadventures of a bobo abroad.

Mullahs on the Verge: Iran's People, Iran's Pulpits

Despite the tension mounting between Iran's leaders and practically everyone else—at home and abroad—Abbas Milani argues that the West should address the problem with smart diplomacy, not smart bombs.

Feeble Critiques: Capitalism's Petty Detractors

Last year's financial crisis has been touted as a cataclysm akin to the fall of Communism, but Jagdish Bhagwati argues that such comparisons exaggerate the problem—and free marketers need not apologize for liberal policies.
1 May 2010

'A Cursed and Pernicious Seed': The Destruction of the Moriscos

In 1609, the Spanish decided it was time to get rid of the Muslim converts to Christianity who had been living among them for years. Fouad Ajami reviews a new history of the expulsion.
1 Sep 2009

American Brethren: Hebrews and Puritans

From the first Thanksgiving to The Scarlet Letter, the Puritans are well known to most Americans. But as Jim Sleeper reminds us, Cotton Mather and his tribe took more than one of their strokes from the ancient Hebrews—and the influence lives on.

The Cosmopolitan Tongue: The Universality of English

This century promises the death of most of the world's languages, but John McWhorter assures us we probably won't miss them.
27 Feb 2013

A Taste of Freedom: Burma’s Guarded Optimism

Burma’s new leaders have introduced genuine but tentative reforms that have sparked a new optimism among the youth and a level of public discourse unthinkable only a year ago.
1 Jun 2009

Cuban Days: The Inscrutable Nation

For years, Cubans had been sneaking off the island on flimsy boats, usually under cover of darkness, but now they were free to construct seagoing vessels in their backyards or on neighborhood streets.

Obama’s Inheritance: Al-Qaeda in Retreat

In a widely noted speech in May, President Obama said George W. Bush’s national security policies created a mess. The president is wrong. President Obama actually inherited a very strong hand on national security issues.

Best Intentions: An Appreciation of Graham Greene

Appearing in 1955, Graham Greene’s prophetic novel The Quiet American was a fictional narrative that became a must-read for those seeking to understand how the United States blundered so badly in Vietnam.

The Unwise Men: The Decline of a Caste

In a cutting and brilliant essay, Stephen Graubard, of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, chronicles the decline of an American caste.

Twice Branded: Western Women in Muslim Lands

Judy Bachrach explores the plight of Western women living in Muslim lands.
30 Aug 2013

Getting Congo Right: Can the West Fix Past Failures?

After two decades of incoherent policies, millions have died in the war-torn Democratic Republic of Congo. Can a new Western-organized counterinsurgency force really bring resolution?
24 Dec 2012

The Coming Surge of Cuban Refugees

A new Cuban law that allows its citizens to travel abroad will likely create a surge of travel—and political refugees—to the US. And Washington appears oblivious to the consequences.
20 Dec 2013

It’s Time to Aid North Korea’s Dissidents

As accounts of atrocities in North Korea’s heinous prison camps become impossible to ignore, the West must join with defector networks to bolster the resistance.
28 Feb 2012

Pipeline to Nowhere: The Beijing-Moscow Dance Continues

The pipeline’s deadlocked negotiations are precisely what you’d expect after Russia’s corrupt, state-run monopoly forced borrowing from its future customer.

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