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1 Mar 2010

Child of the Devolution: Growing Up Red

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh tells his extraordinary story of growing up an American Communist.
26 Feb 2014

Isle of Light: A Look Back at the Boat People and the European Left

After the fall of South Vietnam, Paris’s antiwar left mobilized to condemn and partially remedy atrocities committed by the communist victors whose cause some had even championed.
28 Feb 2012

Reinventing Canada: Stephen Harper’s Conservative Revolution

A robust, proactive foreign policy accompanied by fealty to a monarch and support for Israel at the UN might not sound very Canadian—but it is now.
1 Mar 2011

Mind the Gap: Is the Relationship Still Special?

The Anglo-American alliance remains the world’s most powerful bilateral partnership. But as the Obama administration casts its favor to farther reaches of the globe, what lies in store for the special relationship?

Unschooled: How to Better Train Our Nation Builders

Despite a basic shift in US military doctrine after 9/11, the Pentagon has yet to adapt its training to fit its new stability operations, leaving civilian and military personnel unprepared for their tasks.
31 Aug 2011

Toward a Smarter Power: Moving Beyond the Rhetoric

The Obama administration is right to increase the civilian role in foreign 
policy, but its “smart power” efforts should be smarter than they are.

3 Jan 2012

Man On A Mission: Bill Browder vs. the Kremlin

After the Kremlin tortured and murdered one of his lawyers for investigating government corruption, Bill Browder began a global campaign to bring justice to Sergei Magnitsky's killers.
1 Nov 2010

Shadow Wars: Debating Cyber 'Disarmament'

No less a figure than President Obama has now acknowledged the existence of Web-based warfare. So shouldn't there be cyber war treaties? NPR's Tom Gjelten explores the often nebulous world of cyber 'disarmament.'
30 Dec 2012

First Strike: US Cyber Warriors Seize the Offensive

The US has abandoned its previous dependence on defensive cyber strategies and has shifted into high gear with the aim of developing superior first-strike capacities.
1 Jul 2011

Iggy Pops: The Michael Ignatieff Experiment

The celebrity intellectual decamped from Harvard to join Canada’s political fray in what was supposed to be a sure rise to the top. What went wrong?

26 Apr 2012

Israel and Iran: An Attack Might Be Necessary, but Not Yet

The US, Israel, and its allies cannot allow a nuclear Iran, but any military action should be US-led and only occur if all diplomatic, economic, and covert tactical options are exhausted.
15 Jul 2013

China's Bid for Smithfield

A Chinese tycoon intends to purchase Smithfield Foods, the world’s largest pork producer. Some Washington lawmakers are concerned—and others ought to be.
8 Sep 2013

It's Tony Abbott Time!

How an unlikely conservative leader won a crushing election victory Down Under.
20 Dec 2013

It’s Time to Aid North Korea’s Dissidents

As accounts of atrocities in North Korea’s heinous prison camps become impossible to ignore, the West must join with defector networks to bolster the resistance.
1 Sep 2010

The State of the Craft: Is Intelligence Reform Working?

Former CIA Director Michael V. Hayden explores the changes that the 2004 Intelligence Reform Act has brought—and wonders if we've really done enough to fix the problems.
28 Feb 2012

It’s Not Just Al-Qaeda: Stability in the Most Dangerous Region

In a region defined by historic and violent divides, hostile intent, and nukes, the US and NATO have no viable alternative but to stay the course. 
1 Sep 2011

The Defector’s Tale: Inside North Korea’s Secret Economy

The “Royal Court Economy,” begun as a stopgap as Soviet funding dried up, has grown into a hidden mechanism to keep the Kim dynasty in power.

29 Dec 2013

The Alcatraz Gang: Eleven American POWs in Hanoi’s Notorious Camp

Alvin Townley’s book is the first to tell the story of the eleven American POWs who were dispatched to a dingy, secret prison camp in Hanoi to endure unspeakable torture for their defiance.

Fixing US Foreign Assistance: Cheaper, Smarter, Stronger

US aid has often been counterproductive to its goals in the last decade, just when America urgently needed a strong image abroad. Can it be fixed by returning to earlier development practices?
13 Dec 2011

Are the Peasants Revolting? Occupy Wall Street’s Foreign Policy

Historically, class warfare has made itself both complicated and simplistic. In the words of one DC Occupier, “We’re not anarchists, we’re just using their tent.”
1 Jan 2011

The Enemy We Need: Washington Courts a Repressive Uzbekistan—Again

Uzbekistan has one of the most repressive political systems in the world, but these days the country’s strongman Islam Karimov is back in Washington’s good graces.
1 Jul 2011

Persons of Interest: Britain Learns from Ex-Islamists

Two former extremists prove just how much the UK learns from its reformed enemies (and why the US should do the same).

2 Nov 2011

Flip-Flop War: Libya’s Punk Revolution

The fighters who toppled Qaddafi were poorly organized, but their victory could signal a new type of insurgency warfare.
29 Dec 2013

The Art of Diplomacy: Exhibitions and National Promotion

Anxious to distract from negative economic news and political unrest, European countries like Spain, Greece, and Italy are making a push for cultural diplomacy in the United States.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US intervention in Iraq, as it was carried out, was a mistake. But that is only part of the lesson, and it would be erroneous to conclude that the case of Iraq makes all intervention mistaken.
10 Jun 2011

Fool Me Twice: How the United States Lost Lebanon—Again

US failures in Lebanon in the '80s have always given heartburn to policy veterans. It hardly reassures that recent generations have not done much better.

30 Aug 2013

Blue Gold: The Coming Water Wars

Forget global warming and peak oil—the looming wars of this century will be fought over water, that indispensable resource that democracies typically share but strongmen use as a weapon.
15 Nov 2012

Europe's Baby Boxes & China's Coerced Abortions

An annual rate of seven million abortions—most of which are likely forced by the state—is just one of the horrors of China's ghastly one-child policy. Europe has a different problem.
28 Oct 2013

Terror in Burma: Buddhists vs. Muslims

What began as a nationalist movement in Burma in the 1990s has morphed into an anti-Muslim bigotry and terror campaign being waged by zealots within the country’s Buddhist majority.
27 Oct 2013

Forced Exodus: Christians in the Middle East

In Syria and other parts of the Middle East, militant Islamists have launched a purge of Arab Christians from cities and towns where they have flourished since the dawn of Christianity.
24 Dec 2012

The Coming Surge of Cuban Refugees

A new Cuban law that allows its citizens to travel abroad will likely create a surge of travel—and political refugees—to the US. And Washington appears oblivious to the consequences.
28 Oct 2013

No Exit: Why the US Can’t Leave the Middle East

Seeing only dim prospects in Egypt, Libya, and Syria, and recalling the wars of the last decade, most Americans understandably want to quit the Middle East. But that simply isn’t an option.
20 Mar 2013

Can the UN Stop Kim’s Human Rights Crimes?

The UN’s special rapporteur for human rights in North Korea is only the latest to urge the body to take action against the regime’s widespread abuses and crimes. But will anything really be done?
16 Aug 2013

Why the Brotherhood Failed

After alienating allies and clumsily targeting enemies, the Muslim Brotherhood met its demise after just a year in office, as did Washington’s already weakened influence in Cairo.
28 Jun 2013

Terror Data: US vs. UK

There’s no single counterterrorism solution, but recent studies of more than a decade of attacks in the US and the UK might reveal patterns that will aid law enforcement going forward.
1 Jan 2011

Anchors Away: American Sea Power in Dry Dock

After a decade of counterinsurgency warfare, it's hard to remember that America's global leadership used to be—and still is—based on its naval power. But that shouldn't excuse utterly neglecting it.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

Practitioners in the intelligence community are drawing their own lessons from Iraq—about intel as evidence, communicating with policymakers, and false distinctions between strategy and tactics.

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US failed to collaborate with opposition forces inside Iraq before the invasion and thus blundered into an occupation of a country of which we knew little.
28 Feb 2012

Pipeline to Nowhere: The Beijing-Moscow Dance Continues

The pipeline’s deadlocked negotiations are precisely what you’d expect after Russia’s corrupt, state-run monopoly forced borrowing from its future customer.
27 Feb 2013

Cuba’s Health-Care Diplomacy: The Business of Humanitarianism

Cuba’s regime might look like a relic of the Cold War, but one of its longstanding programs—outsourcing health-care professionals to other countries—remains alive and well.

Absolute Fiction: The Perversion of Sovereignty

The idea that sovereignty does not confer upon the sovereign an absolute right to do as he wishes predates the 1990s. World War II, and above all the Holocaust, put an end to the principle of absolute sovereignty that had dominated political theory and practice since the Peace of Westphalia in 1648 ...
11 Dec 2012

Egypt’s Mounting Crisis

President Morsi is a lonely man these days. As protesters rally against him, he’s depending on a security apparatus he barely trusts—and that might not trust him either. Will the center hold?
28 Jun 2013

Australia’s Next Prime Minister? An Interview with Tony Abbott

Conservative Tony Abbott has gotten the attention of Australia’s political elite and, with his ruling opponents in disarray, appears well positioned to win September’s election. How would he govern?
27 Feb 2013

The Origins of ‘Big Government’: FDR’s Welfare or Warfare?

Political historian James Sparrow’s persuasive new book argues that, contrary to traditional accounts, it was World War II, not the New Deal, that created today’s “big government.”
1 May 2010

'A Cursed and Pernicious Seed': The Destruction of the Moriscos

In 1609, the Spanish decided it was time to get rid of the Muslim converts to Christianity who had been living among them for years. Fouad Ajami reviews a new history of the expulsion.
30 Aug 2013

Trials and Tribulations: Politics as Justice at the ICTY

Two billion dollars later, the ICTY shuts its doors after twenty-five years of arbitrary, uneven, and often hypocritical ‘justice’ for the Balkans. Self-justifying US foreign policy politics played a big role.

Pope Francis: Resurrecting Catholicism’s Image?

Pope Francis’s early moves indicate that the first non-European heir to St. Peter’s throne intends to reorient the Church’s style, substance, and priorities. Catholicism’s image may well benefit.

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