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1 Mar 2010

Fearful Asymmetry: Reading the Goldstone Report

Despite its flaws, the Goldstone Report points up the fundamental contradiction between the needs of great powers and the demands of international law.
1 May 2011

Lost in the Levant: Lebanon Reappraised

In The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Beirut Daily Star editor Michael Young offers a timely and beautifully written accounting of Lebanon's struggle for stability amid political and religious diversity and extremism.
12 Sep 2014

Putin Attacks the West's Soft Underbelly

According to Tocqueville, democratic countries have trouble fathoming how un-democratic countries truly operate. Vladimir Putin has crafted his Ukraine policy to capitalize on this weakness.
29 Jul 2014

Terror and Politics in Tunisia

Tunisians are coming to terms with the homegrown terrorists who threaten their fragile democracy. Will this recognition prompt a much-needed national reconciliation process?
7 Oct 2014

Chechnya, Russia’s Forgotten War

The annexation of Crimea earlier this year shored up Vladimir Putin’s falling approval ratings, but the start of the Second Chechen War 15 years ago brought him to power in the first place.
27 Aug 2014

China’s Third Era: The End of Reform, Growth, and Stability

After Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the People’s Republic of China has now entered its third era, a period to be marked by economic decline, political turbulence, and external belligerence.
31 Oct 2014

The Stubborn South: Why Seoul Needs to Mend Ties with Japan

While Tokyo bulks up against Chinese aggression, South Korea insists on prolonging historical grievances with the Japanese. It’s time for Seoul to put strategic interests first.
16 Apr 2014

The Once and Future Threat: Al-Qaeda Is Hardly Dead

The Obama administration has made much of the demise of al-Qaeda in recent years, but Osama bin Laden’s network is remarkably resilient—and remains a deadly threat.
31 Oct 2014

Editor’s Introduction

The dark uncertainty that characterizes international affairs was (strange as it might seem) captured in a recent remark by Vice President Joe Biden, who observed that the world order we’ve known for nearly seventy years seems now to be “literally fraying at the seams.” We here at World Affairs feel that literal fraying, too. Yet we also believe that its continuation is not predetermined, which is why we’ve published an excerpt from Michael Zantovsky’s forthcoming Havel: A Life. Zantovsky (currently the Czech Republic’s ambassador to the Court of St. James’s) was a friend and comrade-in-arms of Vaclav Havel’s during the days when Charter 77 helped cause a different kind of fraying—of the loathsome fabric of the Soviet Union.
17 Sep 2012

The Looming WMD Crisis in Syria

As warfare and instability continue to rattle Syria, the possibility that terrorists could acquire the regime's chemical and biological weapons is getting disturbingly more likely.
29 Dec 2013

The Art of Diplomacy: Exhibitions and National Promotion

Anxious to distract from negative economic news and political unrest, European countries like Spain, Greece, and Italy are making a push for cultural diplomacy in the United States.
30 Aug 2013

Trials and Tribulations: Politics as Justice at the ICTY

Two billion dollars later, the ICTY shuts its doors after twenty-five years of arbitrary, uneven, and often hypocritical ‘justice’ for the Balkans. Self-justifying US foreign policy politics played a big role.
31 Oct 2014

The Jew of Nations: The Global Demonization of Israel

A new book explores the many reasons why perceptions of Israel have shifted so dramatically over the years, turning the Jewish state from an underdog into a global villain.
30 Aug 2012

The Coming Collapse: Authoritarians in China and Russia Face an Endgame

Russia and China—either (or both) could collapse soon. Yet neither the president nor his challenger seem alert to, or prepared for, such a possibility.
1 Mar 2010

Saviors & Sovereigns: The Rise and Fall of Humanitarianism

Let's face it: liberals and conservatives alike are running out of explanations for our role in the world.
1 Jul 2011

1989 and 2011: Compare and Contrast

A comparison of the two great revolutions of our era illuminates the promise and sobering challenges ahead for the Arab Spring.

27 Aug 2014

Collective Defense: Abe’s New Security Plan

In the face of Chinese territorial aggression and doubts about Washington’s security commitments, Prime Minister Abe of Japan is moving ahead with a controversial new defense policy.
27 Dec 2011

The Next al-Qaeda? Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Future of Terrorism in South Asia

Lashkar-e-Taiba has morphed from a militia operating in Kashmir to a regional broker with designs on becoming the next global terror network.
27 Aug 2014

Strange Bedfellows: Putin and Europe’s Far Right

If Europe’s far-right, pro-Russia parties gain in upcoming national elections, the EU may divide further and find it very difficult to deter Russian aggression in Ukraine and elsewhere.
30 Aug 2012

Learning from Sadat: The Dividends of American Resolve

Anwar Sadat steered Egypt away from the USSR and allied with the West because he saw the value of a US partnership. Can Washington inspire that confidence again?
1 Mar 2009

Freedom’s Untidy: Democracy Promotion and Its Discontents

The scale of the catastrophe in Iraq not only invites a long, hard stare at the wreckage but ignites the question of what to conclude.
30 Dec 2012

Strange Bedfellows: China’s Middle Eastern Inroads

Who landed the billion-dollar bid for Algeria’s Grand Mosque project? An Algerian firm? A regional firm? No, a state-owned Chinese company. The deal is just one of China’s controversial Mideast ties.
31 Oct 2014

In Search of Allies: Vaclav Havel and the Expansion of NATO

Contrary to Kremlin spin, the expansion of NATO was a good thing. Europe is safer today because of it, just as Vaclav Havel, with the help of Bill Clinton and Lech Walesa, envisioned years ago.
7 Jun 2013

Is the Sunni Saudi Kingdom Next?

While Syria’s neighbors are nervous about the war spilling into their own countries, Saudi Arabia's leaders fear that the Saudi jihadists now fighting in Syria will bring their training home to overthrow the kingdom.
18 Apr 2014

America’s Purpose and Role in a Changed World

The United States likes to think of itself as a reluctant warrior, but recent history has plenty of examples of why American leaders should pursue a more forceful and vigilant foreign policy.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

While Iraqis may have been unprepared to manage affairs of state after Hussein’s removal, it would have been preferable for Iraqis to make governing mistakes, rather than American occupiers.
28 Feb 2012

Reinventing Canada: Stephen Harper’s Conservative Revolution

A robust, proactive foreign policy accompanied by fealty to a monarch and support for Israel at the UN might not sound very Canadian—but it is now.
1 Sep 2011

Ten Years Later

“Most Americans seem reluctant to rule out the possibility that, throughout the decade now closing, people faced with difficult choices and unprecedented problems largely did what was appropriate and necessary at the time they had to decide and act.”
27 Aug 2014

Jihad in the Balkans: The Next Generation

Militant Islamists have long had a presence in the Balkans, and many have now traveled to fight in Syria. What happens when they return, battle-hardened, with their European passports?
26 Apr 2012

Germany and the Euro Crisis: Is the Powerhouse Really So Pure?

The euro myth tells of the Continent’s profligate south and thrifty north, but many EU problems track back to Germany’s aggressive drive for economic dominance.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

Americans seem to have learned very little from the Iraq invasion—not least neoconservatives, who have yet to seriously reconsider their support for military intervention abroad.

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

Practitioners in the intelligence community are drawing their own lessons from Iraq—about intel as evidence, communicating with policymakers, and false distinctions between strategy and tactics.
26 Apr 2012

The Next Greece? A Sketch of Spain

Spain’s austerity efforts and fiscal reforms have produced hopeful but inconclusive results. With Europe’s highest rate of unemployment, Spain remains saddled by a staggering deficit, spiking crime, an unsettled population, and increasingly tense regional divides.
1 Mar 2010

The Party's Over: China's Endgame

Despite the endless stream of stories touting China's dominance, the Communist Party in Beijing is hemorrhaging financially and politically—and probably won't last much longer as is.
1 Jul 2011

The Police State Playbook: An Introduction

Dictators tend to be pretty unoriginal – maybe because they all use the same playbook.

15 Apr 2013

Aid Syrian Rebels after Assad Falls

Syria’s Nusra Front and al-Qaeda in Iraq have merged, making it likely that US and EU aid to anti-Assad rebels will inadvertently strengthen Sunni terror groups in the Syrian–al-Qaeda civil war to come.
29 Apr 2013

Editor’s Introduction

reduced ethnic violence. Whether Iraq’s democracy will endure and mature ...

27 Aug 2014

The Russia-China Gas Deal: Implications and Ramifications

Russia and China agreed to a thirty-year, $400 billion energy deal in May. The specifics remain murky, but it’s clear the neighboring powers have sealed a major, long-term partnership.
31 Oct 2012

Libya’s Year One: Life After Qaddafi

Libyans are striving to rebuild their country, but Qaddafi left “a destroyed people” in his wake, in the words of one activist, and it will take time for them to heal themselves.
27 Aug 2014

Yes, Russia Matters: Putin’s Guerrilla Strategy

Russia today is not as strong as the Soviet Union once was, but Vladimir Putin has used energy and financial leverage, along with propaganda, to snatch power from the jaws of weakness.
1 Jan 2011

Letter from the Editor: January/February 2011

States failed to promote Western values when Iraq was hungry for them (when ...

28 Feb 2012

Willing or Waning? NATO’s Role in an Age of Coalitions

In spite of an expanded and increasingly divergent membership, NATO has managed to remain unified and effective by deferring to ad hoc coalitions of the willing. Can it last?
30 Aug 2013

Pope Francis: Resurrecting Catholicism’s Image?

Pope Francis’s early moves indicate that the first non-European heir to St. Peter’s throne intends to reorient the Church’s style, substance, and priorities. Catholicism’s image may well benefit.
8 Nov 2011

A Nuclear Iran Could Upend the World

This week's IAEA report has stripped Iran's nuclear program of its civilian disguise.
17 Jun 2014

Putin’s Zugzwang: The Russia-Ukraine Standoff

Vladimir Putin has gotten himself into such a tight spot in Ukraine that the West and its allies must prepare for any possible outcome. If there’s a silver lining, it’s that Kyiv will be emboldened as well.
1 Sep 2010

An Old, Old Story: Misreading Tet, Again

It seems the only thing the news media do better than misinterpret the Tet Offensive is misapply its lessons to our current wars.
25 Mar 2008

Freedom Fighter Called “Terrorist” by INS

for destruction by insurgents for “collaboration.” He wants to return to Iraq ...

17 Jun 2014

The Russians of Estonia: Twenty Years After

The Kremlin has vowed to defend Russians abroad, but that’s an unwelcome promise to many of the ethnic Russian living outside the country, including in neighboring Estonia.
27 Aug 2014

European Disunion: Cameron, the EU, and the Scots

If the yeas have it on September 18th, David Cameron will be remembered as the prime minister who lost Scotland. He also faces the prospect of being the man who led Britain out of the EU.
18 Apr 2014

Editor’s Introduction

of the US from Iraq, and the wretched civil war that has made Syria ...

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