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1 Mar 2011

Yes, Nukes: The Global Zero Utopia

Back in the 1930s, the great powers thought it wise to declare war obsolete. Never mind that it still suited some nations just fine. Fast-forward seventy years and the same illusion stalks the globe again—this time over nuclear weapons.
20 Mar 2013

Can the UN Stop Kim’s Human Rights Crimes?

The UN’s special rapporteur for human rights in North Korea is only the latest to urge the body to take action against the regime’s widespread abuses and crimes. But will anything really be done?
1 Sep 2010

The State of the Craft: Is Intelligence Reform Working?

Former CIA Director Michael V. Hayden explores the changes that the 2004 Intelligence Reform Act has brought—and wonders if we've really done enough to fix the problems.
30 Aug 2013

Central Europe’s Velvet Power: Can It Reinvigorate EU Foreign Policy?

Having shaken off the Soviet yoke, the Czech Republic, Poland, Hungary, and Slovakia have made significant political and economic progress. Now can they make their mark in the EU?
29 Dec 2013

Editor’s Introduction: In Hanoi, Going Forward and Backward

propaganda coup. In the early spring of 1966, as he prepared for what he ...

Politics in Russia: The Kremlin’s Troubles

Before the Moscow mayoral election, Aleksei Navalny was a rising star in Russia’s fragmented opposition. By the time it was over, he had in effect become its leader. The Kremlin’s plan has gone awry.
1 Jan 2011

The No-Show: Why Values Should Have Mattered in Iraq

The US took its blood and treasure to Iraq to topple a tyrant and build a democracy. But it forgot its most appealing asset, its liberal cultural values, allowing lesser forces to fill the void.
29 Dec 2013

The Alcatraz Gang: Eleven American POWs in Hanoi’s Notorious Camp

Alvin Townley’s book is the first to tell the story of the eleven American POWs who were dispatched to a dingy, secret prison camp in Hanoi to endure unspeakable torture for their defiance.
1 Mar 2010

Unruly Clients: The Trouble with Allies

We just gave $7.5 billion to Pakistan and got ridiculed by the parliament, army chief, and former president. We give Yemen $121 million each year and the country remains a terrorist hotbed. What, exactly, have we bought into here?
29 Dec 2013

Fixing US Foreign Assistance: Cheaper, Smarter, Stronger

US aid has often been counterproductive to its goals in the last decade, just when America urgently needed a strong image abroad. Can it be fixed by returning to earlier development practices?
1 Mar 2010

Saviors & Sovereigns: The Rise and Fall of Humanitarianism

Let's face it: liberals and conservatives alike are running out of explanations for our role in the world.
27 Jun 2012

Anger Mismanagement: Bahrain’s Crisis Escalates

Tensions continue to rise in Bahrain between the ruling Sunni family and majority Shia anti-government protesters—and a peaceful resolution is increasingly unlikely.
1 Sep 2010

An Old, Old Story: Misreading Tet, Again

It seems the only thing the news media do better than misinterpret the Tet Offensive is misapply its lessons to our current wars.
26 Apr 2012

Tehran Politics: Are the Mullahs Losing Their Grip?

Are divisions within Iran’s longstanding theocracy weakening the religious fundamentalists’ grip on power? And what might come next?
16 Aug 2013

Why the Brotherhood Failed

After alienating allies and clumsily targeting enemies, the Muslim Brotherhood met its demise after just a year in office, as did Washington’s already weakened influence in Cairo.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The lessons of the Iraq War now pass as conventional wisdom, but the intervention-averse policies of the Obama administration in Syria suggest the wrong lessons have been learned.
21 Dec 2011

Vaclav Havel: Rock ’n’ Roll and the Power of the Powerless

What ideas and events actually shaped Vaclav Havel's rise as a Czech dissident in the 1970s?
29 Dec 2013

The Art of Diplomacy: Exhibitions and National Promotion

Anxious to distract from negative economic news and political unrest, European countries like Spain, Greece, and Italy are making a push for cultural diplomacy in the United States.
11 Dec 2012

Egypt’s Mounting Crisis

President Morsi is a lonely man these days. As protesters rally against him, he’s depending on a security apparatus he barely trusts—and that might not trust him either. Will the center hold?
28 Oct 2013

Dispatch from Syria: Can Rebels Learn to Govern?

Whether helping to run refugee camps or debating political models, some Syrians in rebel-held areas are testing what shape a post-Assad government might take in theory and in practice.
29 Apr 2013

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

Practitioners in the intelligence community are drawing their own lessons from Iraq—about intel as evidence, communicating with policymakers, and false distinctions between strategy and tactics.

Lessons Learned: The Iraq Invasion

The US failed to collaborate with opposition forces inside Iraq before the invasion and thus blundered into an occupation of a country of which we knew little.
28 Jun 2013

Kremlin Crooks: Putin’s ‘Patriotic’ Hypocrites

Soviet heavies were fond of chastising the West and punishing activists with alleged foreign ties, but at least they did so without Virgin Island bank accounts and luxury US property holdings.

Terror Data: US vs. UK

There’s no single counterterrorism solution, but recent studies of more than a decade of attacks in the US and the UK might reveal patterns that will aid law enforcement going forward.
21 Jun 2012

Greece: A Vote for the Euro!—or Maybe Not …

If this weeks’ Greek elections were a referendum on the euro, it’s by no means obvious that the euro won.
30 Aug 2013

Editor’s Introduction

along the lines of its Founder’s intent. As part of its full menu, ...

27 Feb 2013

Cuba’s Health-Care Diplomacy: The Business of Humanitarianism

Cuba’s regime might look like a relic of the Cold War, but one of its longstanding programs—outsourcing health-care professionals to other countries—remains alive and well.
31 Oct 2012

A Tilt Toward China? Australia Reconsiders Its American Ties

Since its publication in August, Hugh White’s “The China Choice” has churned up a controversial debate in Australia about the rise of Chinese power in the region and the wisdom of continued US ties.
27 Feb 2013

The Origins of ‘Big Government’: FDR’s Welfare or Warfare?

Political historian James Sparrow’s persuasive new book argues that, contrary to traditional accounts, it was World War II, not the New Deal, that created today’s “big government.”
30 May 2012

Russia’s Syria Win

The West has responded to the Houla massacre by continuing to press for Syrian “self-determination.” But what’s the point of self-determination if it is dictated by Moscow?
1 Sep 2011

Ten Years Later

“The attacks of September 11, 2001, impelled America to declare war against terrorism. Its unforeseen consequence may be a historic leap in the global spread of democracy and human rights.”
28 Feb 2012

The Perils of Wishful Thinking: On Europe and the Middle East

The problems that struck the EU and the Arab Spring last year could have been predicted (and were by some). Still, why were so many commentators wistfully optimistic?
1 Mar 2010

Fearful Asymmetry: Reading the Goldstone Report

Despite its flaws, the Goldstone Report points up the fundamental contradiction between the needs of great powers and the demands of international law.
1 Jul 2010

The Ghost of Munich: America's Appeasement Complex

Cold War historians Fredrik Logevall and Kenneth Osgood tackle our country's most widely misused historical analogy.
4 Apr 2013

In Plain Sight: A Challenge and a Reply

Richard Royal wrote to us objecting to the representations made by Michael Weiss in his recent article about the Conservative Friends of Russia. We invited Mr. Royal to pen a rebuttal.
30 Dec 2012

The Last Liberal: The Legacy of Joe Lieberman

Some say Joe Lieberman turned his back on his fellow Democrats, but as the Connecticut senator retires, it seems, in retrospect, that American liberals changed, not him.
28 Jan 2013

North Korea’s Overlooked Atrocities

While global leaders remain fixated on North Korea's missile program and its growing capacity to launch an intercontinental nuclear attack, the Kim regime inflicts horrors on millions of its own people.
6 Jun 2013

North Korea’s Legacy of Terrorism

The US once considered North Korea—guilty of dozens of foreign bombings and thousands of abductions—a terrorism sponsor. The listing lapsed, but the horrendous behavior never did.
31 Oct 2012

Hedging Bets: Washington’s Pivot to India

The US-India partnership has expanded beyond “friendship” and trade to become “defining,” as China’s economic and military leverage looms larger in the region.
30 Aug 2013

Trials and Tribulations: Politics as Justice at the ICTY

Two billion dollars later, the ICTY shuts its doors after twenty-five years of arbitrary, uneven, and often hypocritical ‘justice’ for the Balkans. Self-justifying US foreign policy politics played a big role.
22 Dec 2011

Dear Julian: The WikiLeaks Tell-All That Doesn’t

Billed as a peek inside the strange world of WikiLeaks, Daniel Domscheit-Berg’s memoir reads more like a swan song to the author’s beloved former boss, Julian Assange.
1 May 2011

Obama Abroad: Ambitious Realism

Critics frequently complain that President Obama lacks a coherent approach to foreign policy and that he extemporizes issue by issue. A former under secretary of state in the Clinton administration takes a closer look at the president’s response to major issues, however, and discovers a sound strategy that deftly mixes high ambition, caution, and pragmatism.
30 Dec 2012

What’s Next for Georgia? The End of the Rose Revolution

President Saakashvili’s very undemocratic policies and practices in Georgia may have not been acknowledged in the US, but his party’s recent electoral trouncing suggests his citizens well understood.

Dear Mr. President: Zero-Sum Makes Zero Sense

President Obama’s zero-sum approach, and the redistribution it requires, is advancing a deeply flawed and failed philosophy that will stifle initiative and growth in America, and abroad.
30 Aug 2012

The Ultimate Protest: Women Self-Immolate in Tibet

As protests in Tibet intensify, a new trend has emerged—nuns and everyday women are now among the forty people who have self-immolated since last March.
30 Dec 2012

Democracy on the Brink: A Coup Attempt Fails in Romania

Since its bloody revolution, Romania’s progress to democracy has been uneven but forward. But recent bitter political warfare has left the country’s young democracy vulnerable to collapse.
30 Aug 2012

Tibet’s Transition: Will Washington Take a Stand?

Beijing sees the Dalai Lama succession as a way to seize more control in Tibet. Will the US help the country’s democracy in exile or remain focused on other concerns?
6 Sep 2012

Keeping the Onus on Ennahda

The Islamist party seemed moderate while winning its plurality in Tunisia's parliament, but recent incidents show that the West must still pressure Ennahda to truly abandon its extremist past.

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