Quantcast

All World Affairs Content

Error message

The page you requested does not exist. For your convenience, a search was performed using the query 2009 Summer full Bachrach.
30 Dec 2011

Daze of War: The Russia-Georgia Conflict on Film

Even the most hawkish Russia critic will spot the Georgian propaganda at work in Renny Harlin’s latest flick.
27 Feb 2013

Enough Said: The False Scholarship of Edward Said

Many postcolonial and anti-Israeli sentiments are predicated on a set of Edward Said’s arguments, which Muravchik carefully dissects and exposes for their fraudulent scholarship.
26 Apr 2012

US-Pakistan Relations: Common and Clashing Interests

Washington and Islamabad’s ambiguous alliance is insufficient to manage their common and clashing interests. It’s time to fundamentally rethink the relationship, if it’s to endure.
17 Sep 2012

The Looming WMD Crisis in Syria

As warfare and instability continue to rattle Syria, the possibility that terrorists could acquire the regime's chemical and biological weapons is getting disturbingly more likely.
23 Nov 2011

Neglected India: Why Is Washington Ignoring the World’s Largest Democracy?

The US and India are natural allies, but Obama has let China and Pakistan get in the way of New Delhi’s importance.
31 Oct 2012

Libya’s Year One: Life After Qaddafi

Libyans are striving to rebuild their country, but Qaddafi left “a destroyed people” in his wake, in the words of one activist, and it will take time for them to heal themselves.

Breaking from Baghdad: Kurdish Autonomy vs. Maliki’s Manipulation

Given their historical grievances and more recent political warring with Baghdad’s manipulative Maliki government, the Kurds cast a long shadow over the future of a unified Iraq.
30 Aug 2012

China’s Currency Manipulation: A Policy Debate

Beijing’s currency is not the villain it’s often made out to be, and America should start seeing its relationship with China as an opportunity rather than a threat.

The Sufis’ Choice: Egypt’s Political Wild Card

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has gained power, but the traditionally apolitical Sufis have also mobilized. They represent a wild card amid the chaos of Egyptian politics today.
1 Jan 2010

AfPak for Dummies: A Primer

As more Americans head to Afghanistan, the former Indian ambassador to Pakistan offers a rundown of what they might expect to find there.

Fermez la Porte: The Oversimplification of Europe

Christopher Caldwell has a pretty simple read of Europe's woes. David Rieff thinks it's too simple.
30 Aug 2012

Learning from Sadat: The Dividends of American Resolve

Anwar Sadat steered Egypt away from the USSR and allied with the West because he saw the value of a US partnership. Can Washington inspire that confidence again?
27 Jun 2012

Great Leap Backward: China’s Leadership in Crisis

China’s big news this year was supposed to be a calm transition of power. Instead, dueling party leaders and rumblings of dissent have deeply shaken the People’s Republic.

Explosive Video Documents Depth of Putin's Mafia State

A Russian anti-corruption group's video details mind-bending collusion between an elite crime syndicate and Russian officials in the military, intelligence, tax offices, and the courts in a shocking tale of theft, fraud, kidnapping, torture, and murder.

Wartime: Foreign Conflict and Domestic Rights

Despite the achievements of Mary Dudziak’s prior work, her latest book, which discusses US civil liberties in wartime, fails in its argument that foreign conflict gravely threatens domestic rights.
27 Dec 2011

The Next al-Qaeda? Lashkar-e-Taiba and the Future of Terrorism in South Asia

Lashkar-e-Taiba has morphed from a militia operating in Kashmir to a regional broker with designs on becoming the next global terror network.
26 Apr 2012

Israel and Iran: The Grounds for an Israeli Attack

Given Washington’s current reluctance to use military action against Iran’s nuclear program, Western leaders should at least grant that Israeli action is justifiable.

Lines in the Sand: Assad Plays the Sectarian Card

Today’s major world conflicts—autocracy versus democracy; the West versus the China-Russia axis; Iran and its allies versus the US, Israel, and “moderate” Arab states—intersect and collide in Syria, where sectarianism’s ancient hatreds may well tip their outcomes.
28 Feb 2012

Non-Interventionist David Rieff is Wrong on Syria

Especially after Libya, non-interventionists like David Rieff must do more than simply recall the failures of the Iraq War when considering Syria.
17 Nov 2011

Building a New Peace Process

As the dust settles on the failed Palestinian statehood bid, the US and its allies need to recalibrate their efforts around realistic goals.
28 Feb 2012

The Perils of Wishful Thinking: On Europe and the Middle East

The problems that struck the EU and the Arab Spring last year could have been predicted (and were by some). Still, why were so many commentators wistfully optimistic?
1 Sep 2011

Ten Years Later

“The shock of 9/11 was not, in the end, enough to heal the US body politic. Ten years ago, Americans wondered, in unison: ‘Why do they hate us?’ Today, we need to ask: ‘Why do we hate each other?’”
14 Nov 2011

Belarus, the Land of No Applause

The increasingly paranoid, oppressive reign of dictatorial Belarusian president Aleksandr Lukashenko appears more and more likely to drive the struggling country into all-out "societal madness."
1 Mar 2008

FDR and GWB: Unlearned Lessons of a Wartime Presidency

George W. Bush claimed the attacks of September 11, 2001, would transform American thinking about the world. His model was Pearl Harbor, and he and his supporters routinely summoned the analogy to muster popular support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. But the effect of 9/11 has faded ...
28 Feb 2012

Adrift Down Under: The Labor Party Abandons Economic Reform

After a generation of economic reform, growth, and expansion, Australia’s current Labor-Green-Independent ruling coalition, and the Labor government that preceded it, may give new meaning to the expression “Down Under.”
3 Jan 2012

Afghanistan Now: ‘The People Do Not Want to Go Back’

Terry Glavin's new book shows a side of Afghanistan many Westerners have never seen—and makes a strong case for continuing to help the troubled country.
1 Jan 2011

Spoiler Alert: What Syria's President Really Wants

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad wants to play every one of his neighbors (not to mention the West) for all they're worth.
26 Apr 2012

Read Me If You Can: Censorship Today

Nick Cohen’s new book is a full-spirited, wide-ranging defense of free expression—and an unsparing attack on those who would impede it.
6 Dec 2011

Documented: The WikiLeaks That Show Enhanced Interrogation Worked

Whether intentionally or not, the controversial website has provided ample evidence that enhanced interrogation directly aided the war on terror.
26 Apr 2012

The New Communism: Resurrecting the Utopian Delusion

Despite its intellectual celebrity, the new communism of Slavoj Zizek, Alain Badiou, and their fellow travelers in Western universities offers nothing but a return to left-wing totalitarianism.
1 Jul 2011

Continental Divide: Immigration and the New European Right

Right-wing politics in Europe aren't as reactionary as they've been made out to be.

1 Jul 2010

All Out: China Turns on the Charm

The Heritage Foundation's Helle C. Dale tells how the U.S. is struggling to keep up with China's massive promotional efforts around the world.
1 Sep 2011

Last Man Standing: Is America Fading in the New Middle East?

As US alliances and resolve in the region grow weaker, what role will America play in the new Middle East?

3 Jan 2012

Arab Spring or Islamist Winter?

The end of authoritarian regimes is a positive development, but disillusionment has grown in the Middle East and the West as theocratic forces threaten to reverse the progress of last year's revolutions.
1 May 2011

Lost in the Levant: Lebanon Reappraised

In The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Beirut Daily Star editor Michael Young offers a timely and beautifully written accounting of Lebanon's struggle for stability amid political and religious diversity and extremism.
28 Feb 2012

Willing or Waning? NATO’s Role in an Age of Coalitions

In spite of an expanded and increasingly divergent membership, NATO has managed to remain unified and effective by deferring to ad hoc coalitions of the willing. Can it last?
28 Oct 2011

The Assassins’ Trail: Unraveling the Mykonos Killings

In her painstaking new book, Roya Hakakian recounts the Tehran-backed 1992 assassination of Iranian exiles in Berlin—and the legal and diplomatic complications it spawned.
1 May 2010

But Is It Good for Democracy? Israel's Dilemma

Israel prides itself as a fellow traveler on the road to democracy. So what does that mean for its mission as a Jewish state?
3 Jan 2012

The Dash for Gas: The Golden Age of an Energy Game-Changer

The natural gas market has blossomed in recent years, offering some countries the potential for greater energy independence and setting up a new set of global winners and losers.
1 Sep 2011

From Russia With Greed: British Petroleum’s Other Crisis

As BP’s latest dealings with Russia show, Moscow has no qualms about using predatory tactics in the energy market to reassert control over its neighbors.
15 Mar 2011

The Obama Doctrine: A Modesty of Ambitions

evident in Washington’s response to uprisings in Iran in 2009 and Egypt ...

1 Sep 2011

Royal Pain: The British Republicans’ Waiting Game

Following the underwhelming Will-and-Kate nuptials, a monarchy-free future looks more possible.
1 Jan 2011

Letter from the Editor: January/February 2011

and the wisdom, compassion, and humility that has been evenly deployed during a full ...

1 Jan 2010

Dear Mr. President . . . Unhappy in Our Own Way

Some families get along. The family of nations is not one of those families. And the president needs to realize that. (Abstract)
1 Jul 2010

Letter from the Editor: July/August 2010

as no surprise that he decided to commit his full attention to completing ...

1 Jul 2011

Compromised: Henry Kissinger’s China Syndrome

In his latest book, the aging statesman can't help but ignore Beijing's brutal domestic policies, to the detriment of his other insights.

1 Jan 2011

Big Boom: Robert Pape Remakes Terrorism Studies

Meet Robert Pape, the man whose empirical research has helped reshape terrorism studies as we know it.
28 Oct 2011

Nuclear Safety, Nuclear Security: Whither the IAEA?

The International Atomic Energy Agency has been caught flat-footed so many times in the last decade that its future effectiveness is in doubt.

Pages