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1 Jan 2010

Dear Mr. President . . . Unhappy in Our Own Way

Some families get along. The family of nations is not one of those families. And the president needs to realize that. (Abstract)
13 Dec 2011

Are the Peasants Revolting? Occupy Wall Street’s Foreign Policy

Historically, class warfare has made itself both complicated and simplistic. In the words of one DC Occupier, “We’re not anarchists, we’re just using their tent.”
1 Jul 2010

Letter from the Editor: July/August 2010

as no surprise that he decided to commit his full attention to completing ...

1 Jul 2011

Compromised: Henry Kissinger’s China Syndrome

In his latest book, the aging statesman can't help but ignore Beijing's brutal domestic policies, to the detriment of his other insights.

1 Jan 2011

Big Boom: Robert Pape Remakes Terrorism Studies

Meet Robert Pape, the man whose empirical research has helped reshape terrorism studies as we know it.

The Ethics of Fleeing: What America Still Owes Iraq

The Iraq War has, or bids to, become a litmus test of political identity of the sort that Americans associate with the Vietnam War. We should all be troubled by this. Those of us who opposed the Vietnam War may have called it correctly, but it is important to recall the fates of the Vietnamese ...
28 Oct 2011

Nuclear Safety, Nuclear Security: Whither the IAEA?

The International Atomic Energy Agency has been caught flat-footed so many times in the last decade that its future effectiveness is in doubt.
16 Aug 2011

News Hole: The ICG's Deeply Flawed Syria Report

The International Crisis Group’s latest report on Syria relies almost exclusively on the testimony of Syrian regime figures and its Western apologists, dressed up as “independent” sources.
1 Jul 2010

Gathering Storm: America and China in 2020

Ian Bremmer predicts that the U.S. will face an uphill battle in the next decade as it tries to convince Beijing that it should still value American interests.
10 Jun 2011

Fool Me Twice: How the United States Lost Lebanon—Again

US failures in Lebanon in the '80s have always given heartburn to policy veterans. It hardly reassures that recent generations have not done much better.

1 Jul 2010

Greek Myths: The End of Europe's Free Ride

Vanity Fair's Judy Bachrach explains why Europe has been heading for this fall for years now—and why they'll just have to deal with it.
1 Mar 2011

Unschooled: How to Better Train Our Nation Builders

Despite a basic shift in US military doctrine after 9/11, the Pentagon has yet to adapt its training to fit its new stability operations, leaving civilian and military personnel unprepared for their tasks.

The New Imperialism: China in Angola

Angola has known exploitation before, but China’s efforts there have no equal in recent memory. Under a corrupt president, the country has become a massive construction site — but everyday Angolans remain hopeless and empty-handed.

Mind the Gap: Is the Relationship Still Special?

The Anglo-American alliance remains the world’s most powerful bilateral partnership. But as the Obama administration casts its favor to farther reaches of the globe, what lies in store for the special relationship?

Leaked: What the Mideast Really Thinks of Iran

Thanks to WikiLeaks, it’s now abundantly clear that most Arab leaders want the US to end Iran’s nuclear program. So why do our realist-progressive pundits still think the threat is exaggerated?
1 Jan 2010
1 May 2011

Democracy in Egypt: Applying the Tocqueville Standard

Tocqueville judged a democracy by two key criteria: whether political parties served the essential interests of the entire population and whether citizens appreciated private property. Even in the middle of its Arab spring, Egypt has a long way to go on both counts.
1 Jul 2011

Learning Curve: American Culture and the Muslim World

Ten years after 9/11, hearts and minds still matter just as much on the home front as on the battlefield.

1 Jan 2011

The Mystery of Europe and the Decline and Fall of the War System

safe—even in a completely unredeemed world driven by aggressive leaders, full ...

1 Mar 2011

Decision Time: The Dueling Memoirs of Gerhard Schröder and George W. Bush

In his memoir, President Bush recalls a 2002 meeting in which Chancellor Schröder vowed to support the Iraq War. Schröder says that Bush is “not telling the truth.” If only he had the same standards for his own memoir.

AfPak 2020: A Symposium

Where will Afghanistan and Pakistan be in ten years if the US continues on its current course? We put the question to a group of experts. Their answers might surprise you.
1 May 2011

The Most Dangerous Place: Pakistan’s Past, Pakistan’s Future

To those familiar with Pakistan’s history and politics, it's little surprise that Osama bin Laden turned up there. As more than half a century of problems show, the country faces a deep identity crisis it must soon address if it hopes to survive.
1 Nov 2010

Unveiled: A Case for France's Burqa Ban

French commentator Pascal Bruckner defends his nation's recent burqa ban as a veritable extension of France's most revered liberal traditions.
1 Jan 2011

Power Play: Turkey's Bid to Trump Iran

The flotilla incident last spring was just an opener: Turkey has big plans for its own role in a tumultuous Middle East—and they don't have much to do with helping Tehran, much less the West.

Average Joe: The Return of Stalin Apologists

A spate of new books posits that Stalin wasn't such a bad guy after all—just a strongman boxed in by the perils of history. The journalist Tomasz Sommer and the scholar Marek Chodakiewicz beg to differ.

Anchors Away: American Sea Power in Dry Dock

After a decade of counterinsurgency warfare, it's hard to remember that America's global leadership used to be—and still is—based on its naval power. But that shouldn't excuse utterly neglecting it.
1 Sep 2010

All the Guard's Men: Iran's Silent Revolution

Iran's Revolutionary Guard has eaten up much of the country's political and economic power. It might soon go after the rest.
1 Nov 2010

Facts Meet Freedom: On the Air in Afghanistan

The average American sees Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty as a Cold War relic—if they even know it still exists at all. But as P. J. O'Rourke reports from Kabul, RFE/RL's Afghan service has become a vital part of that country's life and politics.
1 Jul 2010

Northern Exposure: Kurdistan After the Withdrawal

Just what will become of the Kurds after America leaves Iraq?
1 Mar 2010

Child of the Devolution: Growing Up Red

Saïd Sayrafiezadeh tells his extraordinary story of growing up an American Communist.
1 Jan 2011

The Enemy We Need: Washington Courts a Repressive Uzbekistan—Again

Uzbekistan has one of the most repressive political systems in the world, but these days the country’s strongman Islam Karimov is back in Washington’s good graces.
1 Sep 2010

'Fair Game' Glamorizes Distortions and Perpetuates Myths

The new film follows a simple Hollywood line, complete with hero, villain, and distressed damsel. The corollary on the right is that Libby took the fall for Cheney. Both are wrong.

Deleting the Holodomor: Ukraine Unmakes Itself

Stalin's forced famine of 1932–33, which killed four million people, has brought Ukraine's complicated relationship with Russia into sharp focus.
1 Jan 2011

Tanned and Rested: Vaclav Havel Marks His Return with ‘Leaving’

The Czech politician Vaclav Havel has played many roles—dissident, playwright, philosopher president. Now, as his former political director reports, the 74-year-old is making yet another comeback—as a filmmaker.
1 Sep 2010

Innocence Abroad: The Tea Party's Search for Foreign Policy

What's the Tea Party's foreign policy? Well, it's a difficult question on two counts: There doesn't seem to be a Tea Party foreign policy, and, on inspection, there doesn't seem to be a Tea Party . . .
1 Nov 2010

Shifting Sands: Why Peace Talks Might Just Work

Renewed peace talks have certainly drawn their share of skepticism, but veteran ABC News correspondent Robert Zelnick, who has just returned from a Mideast trip, reports that conditions are ripe for a successful deal.
1 May 2010

Ministry of Silly Wars: Britain in Central Asia

Forget the ghosts of Afghanistan: There's plenty to learn from the strange tale of the British in Tibet.
1 Jul 2010

The Broken Link: What Peace Won't Fix

New Republic correspondent and World Affairs blogger James Kirchick argues against the folly of linkage—i.e., the assumption that fixing the peace process will somehow cure all of the Middle East's other ailments.

Smile and Smile: Turkey's Feel-Good Foreign Policy

What do you get when a country uses emotional truth rather than factual evidence to gauge reality? For starters, have you seen any of the headlines from Turkey this year?

State of Play: How South Africa Became South Africa

Matthew Kaminski explores the misunderstood miracle that is South Africa after apartheid.
1 Sep 2010

No Strings Attached: The Case for a Distributed Grid and a Low-Oil Future

Former Director of Central Intelligence James Woolsey joins scholar Rachel Kleinfeld and energy industry expert Chelsea Sexton in proposing a feasible move away from centralized energy grids and oil-dominated industry.
1 Jan 2010

Resumption: The Gears of 1989

For the free world, 1989 felt like the end of history; for those living under the Soviet Union, it was merely a resumption.
1 Mar 2010

Afghan Ghosts: American Myths

Jonathan Steele covered the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan. Now he reflects on how things have changed—and how they haven’t.

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