All World Affairs Content

19 Sep 2016

Echoes: The French Revolution

Shadows of Revolution concerns itself not with predicting the future but with clarifying the past and the understanding the present.
29 Aug 2016

Nepal a Surprising Focal Point for the Global Movement for Democracy

Though the international community pays little attention to Nepal, it’s worth noting how the resilience of the country’s democracy movement is a beacon of hope and its activists are an example to others.
5 Oct 2015

Greek Politics: Economic Crisis or Crisis of Democracy?

Energized by the country’s economic crisis, Greece’s political extremes are violently rocking the cradle of democracy and threatening its longstanding political order.
24 Feb 2016

Russia's Social Media vs. the Kremlin's Domestic Information War

Like their Soviet ancestors, the Kremlin has warped its citizens' worldview with a relentless information war. Can the propaganda be countered via Russia's social media platforms?
8 Nov 2011

A Nuclear Iran Could Upend the World

This week's IAEA report has stripped Iran's nuclear program of its civilian disguise.
13 Nov 2014

Putin the Unifier

Vladimir Putin’s aggression has established a sense of national identity and common purpose that has long eluded the people of Ukraine. It has also forged an anti-Russian consensus.
31 Oct 2014

Abbott Agonistes: Year One for Australia’s Prime Minister

No one expected Tony Abbott to be a Reagan-style fiscal hawk, but conservatives hoped he would at least clean up the mess left by previous governments. One year in, he has yet to make good.
13 Jul 2009

Problem with the Comments Section

Michael J. Totten's blog All comments, including my own, that include links are instantly deleted by my publishing software. Anyone who writes something in the comments section with even a single embedded link ...

17 Mar 2015

Squaring Cuba's Terror Designation in the Circle of the Law

President Obama won’t be able to mend ties with Cuba until it’s removed from the State Department’s list of terrorism sponsors—a designation that has considerable evidence in its favor.
17 Dec 2007

Why I Moderate the Comments Section

Michael J. Totten's blog The reason I moderate the comments section (when I can and don’t have to outsource it to others while traveling) is so it doesn’t turn into a sewer like the one here . (You have ...

1 Jan 2010

AfPak for Dummies: A Primer

As more Americans head to Afghanistan, the former Indian ambassador to Pakistan offers a rundown of what they might expect to find there.
5 Oct 2015

A Path to the Sea: China’s Pakistan Plan

Dwarfing recent US aid and foreign investment, the $46 billion China-Pakistan Economic Corridor could be a game-changer for the region, and even make Beijing a two-ocean power.
21 Dec 2015

Darkness at Noon: FDR and the Holocaust

What did the era’s most prominent symbol of humanitarianism think when confronted with the world’s most compelling moral outrage? History records only a question mark.
27 Feb 2013

In Plain Sight: The Kremlin’s London Lobby

The London-based Conservative Friends of Russia flamed out as quickly as it flared up last year, but its crash exposed the Russian Embassy’s unseemly (and ongoing) effort to coddle Tory politicians.
30 Apr 2015

The Putin Principle: How It Came to Rule Russia

In the wake of the Cold War, Vladimir Putin and his revanchist clique have taken control of Russia by means of a system of mass corruption and predation on a level not seen since the czars.
2 Jul 2009

Comments are Fixed

Michael J. Totten's blog The comments section was broken during the last couple of days, but it seems to be fixed now. ...

1 Mar 2015

No Friends but the Mountains: The Fate of the Kurds

The last time the Middle East was in such disarray, the Ottoman Empire was collapsing and the Kurds were subjected to partition and atrocities. They deserve better this time.
26 Feb 2014

After the Fall: Russia in Search of a New Ideology

The origins of Putin’s authoritarian approach come less from Stalinism and more from the regime the Bolsheviks overthrew. The approach may be popular today, but will it work in the longer run?
27 Aug 2014

China’s Third Era: The End of Reform, Growth, and Stability

After Mao and Deng Xiaoping, the People’s Republic of China has now entered its third era, a period to be marked by economic decline, political turbulence, and external belligerence.
18 Aug 2014

No Winners in Unhinged, Disintegrating Syria

If there’s any hope for Syria, it will only come after all sides realize no one is winning the current conflict, or will win, and that the republic established in 1946 is no more.
6 Jun 2013

North Korea’s Legacy of Terrorism

The US once considered North Korea—guilty of dozens of foreign bombings and thousands of abductions—a terrorism sponsor. The listing lapsed, but the horrendous behavior never did.
29 Apr 2013

Judging History: The Great War, Reconsidered

Nearly a century after World War I began, it’s easier to see the ways it has been misinterpreted over the years. It’s a healthy reminder that few historical judgments are ever ironclad.
17 Jun 2014

Peter and Caesar: Is Pope Francis Shifting the Vatican’s Worldview?

As the first pope from outside of Europe in many years, Francis is less burdened by Vatican tradition—including the foreign policy legacy developed by his predecessors during the Cold War era.
28 Oct 2011

The Oslo Legacy: Goodbye to All That

Now that yet another US president has failed to bring Israel and the Palestinians closer to a settlement, it’s time to abandon the outmoded Oslo negotiation model.
30 Aug 2013

Dispatch from Armenia: The Not So Frozen War

Some “little wars” deserve greater attention. The so-called frozen conflict between Armenia and Azerbaijan, which is pushing Armenia closer to Iran, is one of them.
29 Dec 2013

Editor’s Introduction: In Hanoi, Going Forward and Backward

of prisons in the country were buildings, wings, halls, and sections that were ...

27 Oct 2013

What It Takes: In Defense of the NSA

While many Americans applaud Edward Snowden’s leaks, many have also unwisely discounted the essential role that intelligence plays in the nation’s security, as well as the perils of such leaks.
16 Aug 2011

News Hole: The ICG's Deeply Flawed Syria Report

The International Crisis Group’s latest report on Syria relies almost exclusively on the testimony of Syrian regime figures and its Western apologists, dressed up as “independent” sources.
1 May 2011

Lost in the Levant: Lebanon Reappraised

In The Ghosts of Martyrs Square, Beirut Daily Star editor Michael Young offers a timely and beautifully written accounting of Lebanon's struggle for stability amid political and religious diversity and extremism.
31 Oct 2012

Hedging Bets: Washington’s Pivot to India

The US-India partnership has expanded beyond “friendship” and trade to become “defining,” as China’s economic and military leverage looms larger in the region.
1 Sep 2010

The State of the Craft: Is Intelligence Reform Working?

Former CIA Director Michael V. Hayden explores the changes that the 2004 Intelligence Reform Act has brought—and wonders if we've really done enough to fix the problems.
26 Apr 2012

A Tale of Two Trials: Soviet Propaganda at Home and Abroad

Trials in Prague and New York in 1952 show the extent of Soviet Cold War deception and hypocrisy—not to mention brutality.
1 Mar 2011

The New Imperialism: China in Angola

Angola has known exploitation before, but China’s efforts there have no equal in recent memory. Under a corrupt president, the country has become a massive construction site — but everyday Angolans remain hopeless and empty-handed.

Mind the Gap: Is the Relationship Still Special?

The Anglo-American alliance remains the world’s most powerful bilateral partnership. But as the Obama administration casts its favor to farther reaches of the globe, what lies in store for the special relationship?

Decision Time: The Dueling Memoirs of Gerhard Schröder and George W. Bush

In his memoir, President Bush recalls a 2002 meeting in which Chancellor Schröder vowed to support the Iraq War. Schröder says that Bush is “not telling the truth.” If only he had the same standards for his own memoir.
1 Jul 2011

Iggy Pops: The Michael Ignatieff Experiment

The celebrity intellectual decamped from Harvard to join Canada’s political fray in what was supposed to be a sure rise to the top. What went wrong?

28 Feb 2012

Battle for Bahrain: What One Uprising Meant for the Gulf States and Iran

Bahrain has become the Arab Spring’s “failed” revolution, but for the Sunni Gulf states and Shiite Iran, it has been part of a larger and ongoing battle for regional control.
30 Dec 2012

First Strike: US Cyber Warriors Seize the Offensive

The US has abandoned its previous dependence on defensive cyber strategies and has shifted into high gear with the aim of developing superior first-strike capacities.
1 Nov 2010

Ain't Reporting Hell: Sebastian Junger's Afghanistan

Ann Marlowe just returned from her latest reporting trip to Afghanistan and Major Derrick Hernandez served two tours in Iraq and one in Afghanistan. Together they review Sebastian Junger's portrayal of the Afghan war.
1 May 2011

Obama Abroad: Ambitious Realism

Critics frequently complain that President Obama lacks a coherent approach to foreign policy and that he extemporizes issue by issue. A former under secretary of state in the Clinton administration takes a closer look at the president’s response to major issues, however, and discovers a sound strategy that deftly mixes high ambition, caution, and pragmatism.
1 Jan 2011

The No-Show: Why Values Should Have Mattered in Iraq

The US took its blood and treasure to Iraq to topple a tyrant and build a democracy. But it forgot its most appealing asset, its liberal cultural values, allowing lesser forces to fill the void.
1 May 2010

Hacker Nation: China's Cyber Assault

The Chinese government's recent hacking spate might be news to Americans, but Falun Gong and other dissidents have been dealing for years with the menace of the Communist Party's growing technological prowess.

Family Man: Christopher Lasch and the Populist Imperative

As populism stirs once more, perhaps we should turn our weary eyes to Christopher Lasch—and a new book detailing his writings on the American tradition.

Goldstone: An Exegesis

Joshua Muravchik rebuts James Traub's recent World Affairs article on the Goldstone Report. Traub then offers a brief reply.
1 Sep 2009

Feeble Critiques: Capitalism's Petty Detractors

Last year's financial crisis has been touted as a cataclysm akin to the fall of Communism, but Jagdish Bhagwati argues that such comparisons exaggerate the problem—and free marketers need not apologize for liberal policies.
1 Mar 2009

Not So Huddled Masses: Multiculturalism and Foreign Policy

Twenty years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, America has entered a new era of ethnicity and foreign policy, whose contours are only just now emerging.
1 Mar 2009

Case Closed: A Prosecutor Without Borders

Six years after Luis Moreno Ocampo became Prosecutor of the ICC, the priceless human capital invested in his office is draining away.